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Hope College
Department of English
126 E. 10th St.
Holland, MI 49423

english@hope.edu
phone: 616.395.7620
fax: 616.395.7134

 

Fall 2013 English 113 Courses

English 113, Expository Writing I, encourages students to explore ideas through reading, discussion, and writing. The emphasis is on development of writing abilities; the area of exploration varies with individual instructors.

All English 113 sections fulfill the Core Requirement, but are not counted toward an English major. The English Department encourages each student to select the section which best meets his/her needs.

Here is the list of this semester’s variants; see below for each course description.

113.01 Academic Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Werner MW 8:30 - 10:20 AM
113.02 The American War in Vietnam Emerson MW 8:30 - 10:20 AM
113.03 Writing as Intellectual Exploration Peschiera MW 9:00 - 10:20 AM
113.04 Seminar in Academic Writing
Cole MW 9:00 - 10:20 AM
113.05 The Will to Survive Moreau MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM
113.06 The Will to Survive Moreau MWF 11:00 - 11:50 AM
113.07 American Mashup: Disc. Our Pop Culture Aslanian MW 11:00 - 12:50 PM
113.08 Writing Thoughtfully Kenagy MWF 12:00 - 12:50 PM
113.09 Identity in the Age of Neuroscience Bauman MW 12:00 - 1:20 PM
113.10 Writing Thoughtfully Kenagy MWF 1:00 - 1:50 PM
113.11 American Lives Dykstra TR 9:30 - 10:50 AM
113.12 “Theme for English B” Parker TR 9:30 - 11:20 AM
113.13 “Theme for English B” Parker TR 12:00 - 1:50 PM
113.14 Perception, Power, and Difference Cho TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
113.15 Writing Workshop 2013 Lewison TR 1:30 - 2:50 PM
113.16 Rethinking Health Douglas TR 1:30 - 3:20 PM
113.17 Who are You? Clark TR 3:00 - 4:50 PM
113.18 Writing Workshop 2013 Lewison TR 3:30 - 4:50 PM
113.19 Crichton's Jurassic Park Smith TR 6:30 - 8:20 PM

Course Descriptions

ENGL 113.01: Academic Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric
Werner, Courtney MW 8:30 AM 10:20 AM

In this course, students will begin to become acclimated with writing for a college-educated audience. The foundations of effective writing reach all the way back to ancient civilization, where rhetoric--the art and study of argument--was first developed as a science. Effective writing is also tied to a nuanced understanding of literacy for the 21st century. In this course, students will explore effective writing through the use of rhetoric, rhetorical analysis, and multiple literacies.

Students in the class are expected to contribute regularly and meaningfully to class discussions and activities. This is a writing workshop, which means the majority of our time will be devoted to writing activities, in-class writing workshops, and peer reviews. Group work will take much of our time. Throughout the course, students will accumulate a variety of tools that can be used to strengthen their writing skills. Students will be asked to read substantial texts outside of class (this is part of becoming a stronger thinker and a better writer), write four to five projects, and compose a digital portfolio.

The course prepares students for collegiate argumentation and writing structures. Students will learn to engage in intellectual arguments for different discourse communities, to utilize rhetorical principles, and to discover new elements of argumentation.

ENGL 113.02: The American War in Vietnam
Emerson, Derek MW 8:30 AM 10:20 AM

The American War in Vietnam was a controversial time in the United States. While soldiers were entrenched in a deadly war in Vietnam, the population at home was torn apart in their views on the war. In this class we approach the war through the words of those actively involved, with one novel by an American solider and one by a North Vietnamese soldier. In between we read many smaller excerpts from other writers, discuss different viewpoints, write responses to specific questions, and research and write longer papers. Flagged for Global Learning International.

ENGL 113.03: Writing and Argument
Peschiera, Pablo MW 9:00 AM 10:20 AM

This course develops your skills as a writer of clear, solid expository writing, and provides a solid base for the writing assignments you will encounter at Hope College. Our work together will emphasize writing as a process. This means a focus on exploring, planning, and organization of complex ideas; editing and revising of several drafts; and developing writing skills through effective means of organization, support, and justification of ideas. We will read intellectually intriguing essays, and craft individual, critical responses to those essays. Students will partner in writing workshops that will develop a clear and coherent expository style of writing, and write critical responses to each others' essays. We will develop the ability to write unified and coherent paragraphs and sentences, and contribute to the dialogue about writing that will emerge from our classroom responses and discussions. By the end of the semester, you should have advanced your skills in writing, and produced at least 25 pages of polished prose.

ENGL 113.04: Seminar in Academic Writing
Cole, Ernest MW 9:00 AM 10:20 AM

This course will orient you to the world of expository writing and will provide a solid preparation for the written assignments you will encounter throughout your course work at Hope College. Our work together will emphasize writing as a process and it will focus on exploring, planning, and organization of complex ideas, editing and revising of drafts, and developing writing skills through effective means of organization, support and justification of ideas. As such, students will read intellectually intriguing essays, engage in writing workshops that focus on developing a clear and coherent expository style of writing, craft individual and critical responses, construct unified and coherent paragraphs, and contribute to the dialogue that about writing that would emerge from our classroom responses. By the end of the semester, you should have generated at least 28 pages of polished prose.

ENGL 113.05: The Will to Survive
Moreau, William MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM

After all, isn’t that what life is all about anyway—surviving? To what extent do human beings fight to survive? To what lengths and extremes will we go to cling to life? What is the limit of our hanging on?

In this English 113 section, participants will read, discuss, and be asked to write in response to literature that exemplifies humankind’s desire to survive. To inspire our discussing and writing, we will explore three pieces of “survival” literature. Titles include In Harm’s Way by Doug Stanton (nonfiction), Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody (nonfiction), and The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (dystopian fiction).

And, speaking of survival, a major goal of this class will be to help you “survive” the writing that will be demanded of you in the real world of college and beyond; therefore, we’ll explore and practice writing that narrates, informs, persuades, reviews, responds, shares, and/or entertains.

Class time will be spent discussing the assigned literature and (to a greater extent) responding to and helping each other with the writing we create—in pairs, in small groups, and as a whole class. We will also spend time learning together through informal lectures, student presentations, in-class writing, and individual student-teacher conferences. We’ll choose from different types of writing in order to create some final products, and eventually, we’ll create a more in-depth research project.

ENGL 113.06: The Will to Survive
Moreau, William MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM

After all, isn’t that what life is all about anyway—surviving? To what extent do human beings fight to survive? To what lengths and extremes will we go to cling to life? What is the limit of our hanging on?

In this English 113 section, participants will read, discuss, and be asked to write in response to literature that exemplifies humankind’s desire to survive. To inspire our discussing and writing, we will explore three pieces of “survival” literature. Titles include In Harm’s Way by Doug Stanton (nonfiction), Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody (nonfiction), and The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (dystopian fiction).

And, speaking of survival, a major goal of this class will be to help you “survive” the writing that will be demanded of you in the real world of college and beyond; therefore, we’ll explore and practice writing that narrates, informs, persuades, reviews, responds, shares, and/or entertains.

Class time will be spent discussing the assigned literature and (to a greater extent) responding to and helping each other with the writing we create—in pairs, in small groups, and as a whole class. We will also spend time learning together through informal lectures, student presentations, in-class writing, and individual student-teacher conferences. We’ll choose from different types of writing in order to create some final products, and eventually, we’ll create a more in-depth research project.

ENGL 113.07: American Mashup: Dissecting Our Popular Culture
Aslanian, Janice MW 11:00 AM 12:50 PM

In this course, you will analyze aspects of our popular culture, then use a “mashup” approach to hone your critical thinking skills. A “mashup” essay uses multiple writing strategies and incorporates various media to produce thoughtful, engaging essays.

The four areas of our popular culture we will explore are:

Identity: How do we form our identity as Americans? What part does the media play in defining our gender identity?

Social Media: How has social media altered the way we interact with one another both virtually and physically? Has digital media made the concept of privacy extinct?

Violence: When is fighting okay, and when is it morally incorrect? What purpose do fight clubs serve? How can the more dangerous sports, such as football, remain interesting without permanently injuring those who play them?

Sexuality and Relationships: What are the current sexual trends among teens? Is the institution of marriage obsolete?

You will read a wide variety of thought provoking articles. These readings will be a springboard for discussion and serve as models for your essays. In addition to in-class workshops, you will spend time in the computer lab learning to apply writing style and revision techniques to your papers. You will polish your “works in progress” throughout the semester and submit them in a portfolio for a final grade at the end of the term.

English 113.08 Writing Thoughtfully
Kenagy, Rob MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM

Good writing – regardless of genre – is approached thoughtfully. Memoirs, comics, sports essays, spiritual writing, poems, travel blogs, movie reviews, stand-up comedy, even academic research papers require writers to consider their ideas, beliefs, and their audience. In this English 113 class you’ll have the opportunity to slow down and explore what’s important to you, engage in meaningful conversation with others, and connect with the world around you. We’ll approach writing as a process, and you’ll be challenged to address a number of rhetorical situations in creative and unique ways. You’ll receive quality feedback as you work thoroughly through your writing in a large group, in small groups, and one-on-one. You’ll be asked to reflect on your work and revise often. We’ll also read, analyze, and discuss a wide variety of writing. You’ll learn from your peers and other great thinkers like David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, James Baldwin, and Dave Eggers. Ultimately, this class will prepare you to express yourself intelligently and with care while finding your voice.

ENGL 113.09: Identity in the Age of Neuroscience
Bauman, Elisabeth MW 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

How does your brain shape your personality? How is technology rewiring our brains? Can creativity be taught? How will new insights about the brain change our view of what it means to be human?

Surprising new discoveries about the human brain appear in the media on a daily basis. This semester, venture into the fascinating world of neuroscience and explore what insights these discoveries might offer you about your life and your story. And while we’re asking questions about creativity, memory, motivation and attention, we’ll be thinking about thinking in another, very important sense. After all, writing is a tool for thinking- we write in order to better understand ourselves and our world.

This course emphasizes thinking critically and writing analytically, two essential skills you will need throughout your college career and in your professional life.
In our class discussions, we’ll develop habits of mind that lead to perceptive and attentive reading. Through in-class writing exercises, class presentations and peer-review workshops, we’ll learn to articulate our ideas clearly and persuasively. In our work in the library, we’ll evaluate print and online resources and learn to engage scholarly sources with insight and poise. Most importantly, as we’re learning about creativity and the human brain, we’ll work on becoming more creative ourselves in the kinds of questions we raise- questions that lead to imaginative thesis statements and original papers. Come and explore the potential of your brain.

English 113.10 Writing Thoughtfully
Kenagy, Rob MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM

Good writing – regardless of genre – is approached thoughtfully. Memoirs, comics, sports essays, spiritual writing, poems, travel blogs, movie reviews, stand-up comedy, even academic research papers require writers to consider their ideas, beliefs, and their audience. In this English 113 class you’ll have the opportunity to slow down and explore what’s important to you, engage in meaningful conversation with others, and connect with the world around you. We’ll approach writing as a process, and you’ll be challenged to address a number of rhetorical situations in creative and unique ways. You’ll receive quality feedback as you work thoroughly through your writing in a large group, in small groups, and one-on-one. You’ll be asked to reflect on your work and revise often. We’ll also read, analyze, and discuss a wide variety of writing. You’ll learn from your peers and other great thinkers like David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, James Baldwin, and Dave Eggers. Ultimately, this class will prepare you to express yourself intelligently and with care while finding your voice.

ENGL 113.11: American Lives
Dykstra, Natalie TR 9:30 AM 10:50 AM

This course explores American lives, our American lives, by exploring a key theme – the American Dream and its many meanings. We say that the American Dream is the opportunity for success, the ability to make one’s own choices, the belief that the future will be better? But what is the American Dream, really? How did it develop over time, and who is included or excluded and why? Is the Dream under pressure from many factors - economic, political, cultural, technological? To engage these questions and more, we will be drawing from history, literature, film, and art.

The main task of the course is to learn to write clearly, persuasively, and with authority in preparation for your future courses. Class time is devoted to lively discussion and writing workshops. Come join us!

ENGL 113.12: “Theme for English B”; or, Exploring “Identity” in First-Year Composition: Disney Princess Films and Twilight
Parker, Kendra TR 9:30 AM 11:20 AM

The instructor said,

Go home and write
a page tonight.
And let that page come out of you---
Then, it will be true.

I wonder if it's that simple? (from Langston Hughes’s “Theme for English B”)

First-Year Composition is designed to help students develop expository writing skills. Expository Writing conveys information or explains what is difficult to understand. To prepare you to explain your ideas clearly, this course stresses critical thinking; provides instruction in logic, grammar, and documentation; and encourages debate and discourse about contemporary issues.

This course is inspired by Hughes’s 1949 poem, and the course’s theme focuses on identity, those who deal with lives lived between worlds, and the questions regarding identity formation and perceptions that arise from their investigations. Throughout the course, you will be asked to (re)consider the following questions:

  • Who are you? How do you identify yourself? Is it by skin color? Hair texture? Friends? Religious beliefs? Sports? Scholastic Interests? Social networks? Music? Clothes? Who/What does the world see when they look at you? Do you and the world see “you” in the same way? Are you responsible for the ideas that others hold about you?
  • To what extent do you create your own identity, and to what extent must you accept an identity created for you? To what extent does your identity depend on the people around you, and to what extent is it independent of them? Can you leave your past behind and start over with a new identity? How do we define ourselves when we do not fit into society’s preconceived identity groups, and how does contact with people who are different than us make us rethink these self-perceptions?
  • What responsibilities, if any, do “outsiders” have to adjust to or to assimilate into the existing social community? At what point do these changes begin to alter for the bad one’s unique personal or cultural identity? What responsibilities do people in the “mainstream” have in dealing with people who are different from themselves?

Class activities will involve discussing the assigned literature and film; reading, discussing, and responding to relevant critical articles; writing essays and engaging in the collaborative writing process (peer review, writing workshop); conducting research. Writing workshops and peer reviews will help us revise our essays and from these revisions you will create an online portfolio to showcase the writing process—from draft to final product.

ENGL 113.13“Theme for English B”; or, Exploring “Identity” in First-Year Composition: Disney Princess Films and Twilight
Parker, Kendra TR 12:00 PM 1:50 PM

The instructor said,

Go home and write
a page tonight.
And let that page come out of you---
Then, it will be true.

I wonder if it's that simple? (from Langston Hughes’s “Theme for English B”)

First-Year Composition is designed to help students develop expository writing skills. Expository Writing conveys information or explains what is difficult to understand. To prepare you to explain your ideas clearly, this course stresses critical thinking; provides instruction in logic, grammar, and documentation; and encourages debate and discourse about contemporary issues.

This course is inspired by Hughes’s 1949 poem, and the course’s theme focuses on identity, those who deal with lives lived between worlds, and the questions regarding identity formation and perceptions that arise from their investigations. Throughout the course, you will be asked to (re)consider the following questions:

  • Who are you? How do you identify yourself? Is it by skin color? Hair texture? Friends? Religious beliefs? Sports? Scholastic Interests? Social networks? Music? Clothes? Who/What does the world see when they look at you? Do you and the world see “you” in the same way? Are you responsible for the ideas that others hold about you?
  • To what extent do you create your own identity, and to what extent must you accept an identity created for you? To what extent does your identity depend on the people around you, and to what extent is it independent of them? Can you leave your past behind and start over with a new identity? How do we define ourselves when we do not fit into society’s preconceived identity groups, and how does contact with people who are different than us make us rethink these self-perceptions?
  • What responsibilities, if any, do “outsiders” have to adjust to or to assimilate into the existing social community? At what point do these changes begin to alter for the bad one’s unique personal or cultural identity? What responsibilities do people in the “mainstream” have in dealing with people who are different from themselves?

Class activities will involve discussing the assigned literature and film; reading, discussing, and responding to relevant critical articles; writing essays and engaging in the collaborative writing process (peer review, writing workshop); conducting research. Writing workshops and peer reviews will help us revise our essays and from these revisions you will create an online portfolio to showcase the writing process—from draft to final product.

ENGL 113.14: Perception, Power & Difference
Cho, David TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

This section of English 113 will be focusing on the over-arching theme of differing "Theories of Perception, Power, and Difference." Along with examining various issues in Composition and Rhetoric, to help prepare us for writing academic essays, we will also be looking at essays written by individuals like John Berger, Mary Louise Pratt, and Michel Foucault, respectively, to give us a very broad and challenging range of ideas, definitions, terms, to grapple with intellectually, and for their many applications to other academic and "real-life" contexts. These essays can be found in Gail Stygall's Reading Context. Also, in light of Hope College's commitment to researching and teaching on issues of culture, diversity, and race, (Phelps Scholars Program, IDS Courses, Mission Statement), we will also use our essays as a foundation for us to help in considering issues of race, ethnicity, and difference, using Beverly Daniel Tatum's somewhat oxymoronic title, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting in the Cafeteria Together?, along with a novel, John Okada's No-No Boy, which fictionally delves into a very non-heralded portion of American history and letters, namely the "internment" of Japanese Americans across the West Coast, during WWII and afterwards. Flagged for Global Learning Domestic.

ENGL 113.15: Writing Workshop 2013
Lewison, Mark TR 1:30 PM 2:50 PM

It takes practice and it takes patience to hone writing skills. In this workshop-oriented section of English 113, we explore your interests and experiences to develop a series of essays during the term. We also use several novels and the textbook Concise Guide to Writing as a baseline for our work together. Often, you will find, the writing process is not magic, it's mechanics -- plus a dash of inspiration. With the benefit of the instructor's longtime experience as a writer and editor in the workplace, you will learn about crafting communication for today's audiences, from on paper to online, and from the academic essay to the casual-yet-concise communication of websites and blogs.

ENGL 113.16: Rethinking Health
Douglas, Kim TR 1:30 PM 3:20 PM

One out of three children born in the year 2000 and after is expected to have diabetes. 70 per cent of 12-year-olds have the beginning stages of hardening of the arteries. Half of all men and one-third of all women are diagnosed with cancer at some time in their life. The United States is one of the wealthiest countries in the world, yet suffers from what experts label as “diseases of affluence.” So, what can we do? If we have a genetic predisposition for a particular disease, can we make nutritional, exercise, and other lifestyle choices that reduce the chances of the expression of that gene? Everyday, new claims are made about all kinds of diets, fasting, juicing, and exercise that indicate we might even be able to reverse disease. How accurate are these claims? How do we know which claims to believe? How can we make scientifically-informed decisions to preserve our health?

Throughout the semester, we will investigate a topic that is featured in the news and drives many of the cultural and scientific debates of our day—from national concerns about the rise in obesity and food-related diseases like diabetes, to local issues like school lunch programs and farmers’ markets, to family matters like “What’s for dinner?” We will explore controversies around wellness to make educated and intelligent decisions about how to eat and maintain fitness levels so that we live healthy lives. Class activities will involve viewing relevant films, writing essays and conducting collaborative or individual research. Writing workshops and peer reviews will help us revise our essays in order to create a portfolio to showcase our own original writing.

ENGL 113.17: Who Are You?
Clark, Linda TR 3:00 PM 4:50 PM

Though forty years or more have traveled by – mostly in the fast lane – we could still say that in 2013 much insightful language we might use to describe ourselves and our life views may be expressed in song titles of The Who from the 1960’s and 1970’s. “Who Are You?” continues to have more importance than just as a “CSI” theme song, and consider “Don’t Get Fooled Again,” “How Can You Do It Alone?” “Disguises,” and “I Don’t Even Know Myself.” This expository writing course may allow you to articulate a little of who you are and what you have to say while adding to your preparation for the academic writing requirements at Hope College. Stressing the methods of the writing workshop process, our work will focus on clarity, depth of thought, voice, organization, and language effectiveness. Plan to read a variety of essay samples, write both formally and informally, engage in critical evaluation of your own products and those of others, research and cite thoroughly, and make valuable contributions within the group. Hopefully the class will help with the realization that sincere, fluent thought and writing can occur “Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere.”

ENGL 113.18: Writing Workshop 2013
Lewison, Mark TR 3:30 PM 4:50 PM

It takes practice and it takes patience to hone writing skills. In this workshop-oriented section of English 113, we explore your interests and experiences to develop a series of essays during the term. We also use several novels and the textbook Concise Guide to Writing as a baseline for our work together. Often, you will find, the writing process is not magic, it's mechanics -- plus a dash of inspiration. With the benefit of the instructor's longtime experience as a writer and editor in the workplace, you will learn about crafting communication for today's audiences, from on paper to online, and from the academic essay to the casual-yet-concise communication of websites and blogs.

ENGL 113.19 Crichton's Jurassic Park
Smith, Richard TR 6:30 PM 8:20 PM

Like the movie? Want to read the book? In this course we'll read Jurassic Park and at least one other novel by Michael Crichton, and we'll see the film adaptations of them. We'll use the stories themselves as a way to generate topics for a series of essays; and we'll use novel/film comparison as the basis for a discussion of the sorts of things that control the process of revision. Students will have the opportunity to revise their papers throughout the semester (but not, I think, into cinematographic form).