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Cultural Heritage—Eight Credits

The dominant culture of the United States has its roots in the history and development of “Western culture” and its interplay with “non-Western” societies. For good or for ill, Western culture is now having an increasingly global impact.

Hope students, whether or not they see the dominant culture of the U.S. as “home turf,” benefit from knowing and critically reflecting upon the cultural heritage of Western civilization.

Whatever path a student chooses in meeting this requirement will provide an introduction to some of the central events, questions and concerns that have shaped Western culture. Students will gain an understanding of historical movements, as well as significant literary and philosophical texts. Through discussion and writing, students are encouraged to develop an informed evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the Western cultural legacy which will contribute greater self-understanding.

The overall idea of the Cultural Heritage requirement is to give you an introduction to three humanities disciplines (literature, history, philosophy) through just two courses, and in a way that includes both the ancient world (CH1) and the modern world (CH2).

The Cultural Heritage requirement may be fulfilled by taking IDS 171 and IDS 172, or by taking one of these interdisciplinary courses in combination with a Cultural Heritage course from English, History, or Philosophy. During fall 2008 there is also one interdisciplinary course that covers two disciplines: IDS 174, a CH2 course that includes only literature and history, can fulfill the requirement along with a CH1 course that includes philosophy (IDS 171, 175, or 177 or Philosophy 230).

Students may also fulfill the requirement with a combination of three single-discipline courses, one each from English, Philosophy, and History, two of which must be 4-credit CH1 and CH2 courses; the third may be a 4- or 2-credit course from the third discipline. For a complete list of options for fulfilling this requirement, see the college catalog under “Degree Program” (pp. 109-110). If you have questions, contact Prof. Curtis Gruenler, Director of Cultural Heritage.

Spring Semester 2013

IDS Courses Covering Literature, History, and Philosophy

IDS 171 01 Cultural Heritage I
Allis, James MWF 8:30 AM 9:20 AM
Tragedy, Comedy, Democracy

In Greece, the fifth century B.C. begins with a war (the Persian Wars), which Athens was instrumental in winning, and it ends with a war (the Peloponnesian War), which Athens lost. Throughout this time, Athens develops a flourishing, contentious democracy which contributes to a period of great innovation and turmoil. We see experimentation in self-government, military innovations, new and extraordinary approaches in art and architecture, significant advances in mathematics and science. In this atmosphere of freedom and power, there emerged the literary forms known as tragedy and comedy.

In this class, while looking at the history of 5th century Greece and the rise of Athenian democracy, we will explore the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes. We will investigate how these dramatic forms can allow us to consider such basic human concerns as the possibilities and limits of freedom, what in our lives we control and what we don’t control, the nature of human responsibility, the relations between gods and humans, the relations between men and women, the uses and abuses of power, the promises and dangers of sex and love, the struggles to realize some kind of justice, the conflicts between duties to family and duties to city. And we'll explore the actions and arguments of this strange figure named Socrates, and the ways he challenges our understandings of what might count as a good life. Throughout the course, we will ask, what , if any, connections might exist between the struggles of the Greeks 2500 years ago and our efforts to live our lives today in 2013.

IDS 171 02 Cultural Heritage I
Allis, James MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM
Tragedy, Comedy, Democracy

In Greece, the fifth century B.C. begins with a war (the Persian Wars), which Athens was instrumental in winning, and it ends with a war (the Peloponnesian War), which Athens lost. Throughout this time, Athens develops a flourishing, contentious democracy which contributes to a period of great innovation and turmoil. We see experimentation in self-government, military innovations, new and extraordinary approaches in art and architecture, significant advances in mathematics and science. In this atmosphere of freedom and power, there emerged the literary forms known as tragedy and comedy.

In this class, while looking at the history of 5th century Greece and the rise of Athenian democracy, we will explore the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes. We will investigate how these dramatic forms can allow us to consider such basic human concerns as the possibilities and limits of freedom, what in our lives we control and what we don’t control, the nature of human responsibility, the relations between gods and humans, the relations between men and women, the uses and abuses of power, the promises and dangers of sex and love, the struggles to realize some kind of justice, the conflicts between duties to family and duties to city. And we'll explore the actions and arguments of this strange figure named Socrates, and the ways he challenges our understandings of what might count as a good life. Throughout the course, we will ask, what , if any, connections might exist between the struggles of the Greeks 2500 years ago and our efforts to live our lives today in 2013.

IDS 171 03 Cultural Heritage I
Tseng, Gloria MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM
Jews, Pagans, and Christians: the Ancient and Medieval Worlds Reconsidered

From the heyday of the Roman Empire, when they were a small and vulnerable minority, to the “Christian centuries,” when the papacy was strong enough to rival kings, Christians lived and died in the historical and cultural contexts of their day. They were shaped and informed by their worlds even as they challenged the status quo. As they interacted with the worlds around them, they were in dialog with other cultural and religious traditions. This course will take us on a brief journey of the ancient and medieval worlds and introduce us to their questions and concerns. Emphasis will be given to meditative reading (i.e., texts that call for slow reading and contemplation), and we will consider what they have to say to us in our day in regard to spirituality and other issues of life.

IDS 171 04 Cultural Heritage I
Tseng, Gloria MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM
Jews, Pagans, and Christians: the Ancient and Medieval Worlds Reconsidered

From the heyday of the Roman Empire, when they were a small and vulnerable minority, to the “Christian centuries,” when the papacy was strong enough to rival kings, Christians lived and died in the historical and cultural contexts of their day. They were shaped and informed by their worlds even as they challenged the status quo. As they interacted with the worlds around them, they were in dialog with other cultural and religious traditions. This course will take us on a brief journey of the ancient and medieval worlds and introduce us to their questions and concerns. Emphasis will be given to meditative reading (i.e., texts that call for slow reading and contemplation), and we will consider what they have to say to us in our day in regard to spirituality and other issues of life.

IDS 171 05 Cultural Heritage I
LaPorte, Joseph MW 2:00 PM 3:20 PM
Real Life and the Good Life from Classical Times to Christian

In this course, we will be keeping our eyes on ethical questions, particularly those pertaining to sex and gender, power, and still more broadly, how to live well. The readings for this course are in large part classics, texts that have through the ages been regarded as masterpieces that transcend their own times, and that have something important to say to people of various times and cultures. We will be looking at literature, philosophy, and history as well as some theology; we will be covering these disciplines as they apply to classical Greece and Rome, and then as they apply into the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Because the course proceeds chronologically, we can see in a powerful way how later authors build on earlier ones. Something that particularly excites me about the course is the way it illustrates how Christianity, which became the dominant religion in the West, was born in a classical world and how Christians came to incorporate classical learning and culture from ancient Greece and Rome.

IDS 171 06 Cultural Heritage I
LaPorte, Joseph MW 3:30 PM 4:50 PM
Real Life and the Good Life from Classical Times to Christian

In this course, we will be keeping our eyes on ethical questions, particularly those pertaining to sex and gender, power, and still more broadly, how to live well. The readings for this course are in large part classics, texts that have through the ages been regarded as masterpieces that transcend their own times, and that have something important to say to people of various times and cultures. We will be looking at literature, philosophy, and history as well as some theology; we will be covering these disciplines as they apply to classical Greece and Rome, and then as they apply into the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Because the course proceeds chronologically, we can see in a powerful way how later authors build on earlier ones. Something that particularly excites me about the course is the way it illustrates how Christianity, which became the dominant religion in the West, was born in a classical world and how Christians came to incorporate classical learning and culture from ancient Greece and Rome.

IDS 171 07 Cultural Heritage I
Portfleet, Dianne TR 9:30 AM 10:50 AM
Freedom, Justice, and the Good Life

This course will focus on 4 specific time periods in history: 5th-century B.C. Greece, 1st-century Rome, beginnings of Islam and its expansion, and Dante's Florence. In each of the historical, philosophical and literary readings, we will be focusing on the themes of freedom, justice and the good life. The last half of the semester will be spent reading the Dante’s complete Divine Comedy and expanding on all of the ideas introduced in the earlier writings.

IDS 171 08 Cultural Heritage I
Bassett, Gregory MWF 8:30 AM 9:20 AM
Families, Nations, and Tragedy

We are individuals, members of families, citizens of a country, and part of the world. What are the relationships between these aspects of our identities? Are families small societies, with their own cultures and laws? Are countries large families, held together by the affections of extended kinship? Do the duties we have to those we love conflict with the duties we have to our country? Do the duties we have to our country conflict with the duties we have to those in other countries? If they do, is there any way to decide how to act, or are we doomed to conflict and tragedy? These are questions we still struggle with today, but we can look to the past for some help in answering them. In this class, we will look at how ancient Greeks attempted to understand the relationship between families and broader society, by examining the history, drama, and philosophy of the period.

IDS 171 09 Cultural Heritage I
Bassett, Gregory MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM
Families, Nations, and Tragedy

We are individuals, members of families, citizens of a country, and part of the world. What are the relationships between these aspects of our identities? Are families small societies, with their own cultures and laws? Are countries large families, held together by the affections of extended kinship? Do the duties we have to those we love conflict with the duties we have to our country? Do the duties we have to our country conflict with the duties we have to those in other countries? If they do, is there any way to decide how to act, or are we doomed to conflict and tragedy? These are questions we still struggle with today, but we can look to the past for some help in answering them. In this class, we will look at how ancient Greeks attempted to understand the relationship between families and broader society, by examining the history, drama, and philosophy of the period.

IDS 171 10 Cultural Heritage I
Gruenler, Curtis MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM
Late Antiquity and The Middle Ages from Virgil to Dante

During the 1500 years between the birth of Christ and the Renaissance, the world as we know it today took shape through changes such as the rise of Christianity and Islam, the invention of romantic love, the formation of modern nations, and the interaction of Christian and classical thought. Yet even though this is such a formative time for our own culture, people saw the world much differently that we do. We will try to imagine medieval life and understand medieval thought through the lenses of history, literature, philosophy, and to a lesser extent theology, music, and art. Transporting ourselves to the past can give us a new perspective on the present and on big questions like what makes a good life, what it is to love, and how people can live together well in communities and nations. This will happen most powerfully through our encounter with great texts from this time such as Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, philosophical works by Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, the Lays of Marie de France, and above all Dante’s Divine Comedy, which we will read almost in its entirety. Students will write several short papers, one longer essay, midterm and final exams, and a commonplace book or group project.

IDS 171 11 Cultural Heritage I
Gruenler, Curtis MWF 2:00 PM 2:50 PM
Late Antiquity and The Middle Ages from Virgil to Dante

During the 1500 years between the birth of Christ and the Renaissance, the world as we know it today took shape through changes such as the rise of Christianity and Islam, the invention of romantic love, the formation of modern nations, and the interaction of Christian and classical thought. Yet even though this is such a formative time for our own culture, people saw the world much differently that we do. We will try to imagine medieval life and understand medieval thought through the lenses of history, literature, philosophy, and to a lesser extent theology, music, and art. Transporting ourselves to the past can give us a new perspective on the present and on big questions like what makes a good life, what it is to love, and how people can live together well in communities and nations. This will happen most powerfully through our encounter with great texts from this time such as Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, philosophical works by Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, the Lays of Marie de France, and above all Dante’s Divine Comedy, which we will read almost in its entirety. Students will write several short papers, one longer essay, midterm and final exams, and a commonplace book or group project.

IDS 172 01 Cultural Heritage II
Perovich, Anthony MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM
Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism

While the French Revolution was one of the major events of modern history, the buildup to it and the fallout from it are of equal interest, and all three will be examined in this course. This section of IDS 172 is a “three-discipline” interdisciplinary course: it will focus on European history, literature, and philosophy from the middle of the seventeenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to the intellectual movement known as “the Enlightenment,” to the Revolution itself and the Napoleonic period that ensued, and to the Romantic movement that sprang up alongside the Revolution and continued beyond it. Figures to be read or studied will include Voltaire, Kant, Goethe, Napoleon, and Hegel. The connections of the main themes of this course to other cultural and historical developments, such as the Scientific Revolution, the American Revolution, and the rise of nationalism, will also be explored.

IDS 172 02 Cultural Heritage II
Perovich, Anthony MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM
Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism

While the French Revolution was one of the major events of modern history, the buildup to it and the fallout from it are of equal interest, and all three will be examined in this course. This section of IDS 172 is a “three-discipline” interdisciplinary course: it will focus on European history, literature, and philosophy from the middle of the seventeenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to the intellectual movement known as “the Enlightenment,” to the Revolution itself and the Napoleonic period that ensued, and to the Romantic movement that sprang up alongside the Revolution and continued beyond it. Figures to be read or studied will include Voltaire, Kant, Goethe, Napoleon, and Hegel. The connections of the main themes of this course to other cultural and historical developments, such as the Scientific Revolution, the American Revolution, and the rise of nationalism, will also be explored.

IDS 172 03 Cultural Heritage II
Gibbs, Janis MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM
From Reformation to Revolution

The theme of this interdisciplinary humanities course is “From Reformation to Revolution.” The dynamic which will guide our investigation is change. Change is an important dynamic in human societies. At different times in history, men and women have developed ideas, technologies and movements which have challenged prevailing authorities, shifted people’s understanding of the truth, and changed the world. Changes can be minor, or they can be radical. They can improve existing institutions, or replace them entirely. We sometimes call changes “reforms.” If the changes are profound enough, we call them “revolutions.” How do people foster change? How do they react to calls for reform? What transforms reformation into revolution? What leads people to develop revolutionary changes, or to adopt them? How and why do other people resist reform or revolution? How can people transform the extraordinary energy of revolutionary movements into the energy required to build and maintain new institutions? Do we use the term “revolution” too easily? What is a “reform”? When does a change become revolutionary?

We will study a series of changes between the late fifteenth century (i.e. late 1400s C.E. ) and the early 19th century (1800s C.E. ). Major topics include the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. While we will not consider all of the important, or even all of the revolutionary, changes that have occurred during this period, we will be looking at a variety of kinds of change: religious, political, intellectual, technological, social—and of course, combinations of these kinds of change, since none of them exist alone.

This course is also an introduction to three disciplines within the humanities—history, philosophy, and literature—and to the connections and distinctions between them. We will use a variety of sources to discuss reformations, revolutions, and the people who made them, joined them, resisted them, and were swept up by them. Literature, philosophy and history give us different, though related, ways of understanding the process and the experience of reform and revolution in human history.

IDS 172 07 Cultural Heritage II
Gibbs, Janis MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM
From Reformation to Revolution

The theme of this interdisciplinary humanities course is “From Reformation to Revolution.” The dynamic which will guide our investigation is change. Change is an important dynamic in human societies. At different times in history, men and women have developed ideas, technologies and movements which have challenged prevailing authorities, shifted people’s understanding of the truth, and changed the world. Changes can be minor, or they can be radical. They can improve existing institutions, or replace them entirely. We sometimes call changes “reforms.” If the changes are profound enough, we call them “revolutions.” How do people foster change? How do they react to calls for reform? What transforms reformation into revolution? What leads people to develop revolutionary changes, or to adopt them? How and why do other people resist reform or revolution? How can people transform the extraordinary energy of revolutionary movements into the energy required to build and maintain new institutions? Do we use the term “revolution” too easily? What is a “reform”? When does a change become revolutionary?

We will study a series of changes between the late fifteenth century (i.e. late 1400s C.E. ) and the early 19th century (1800s C.E. ). Major topics include the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. While we will not consider all of the important, or even all of the revolutionary, changes that have occurred during this period, we will be looking at a variety of kinds of change: religious, political, intellectual, technological, social—and of course, combinations of these kinds of change, since none of them exist alone.

This course is also an introduction to three disciplines within the humanities—history, philosophy, and literature—and to the connections and distinctions between them. We will use a variety of sources to discuss reformations, revolutions, and the people who made them, joined them, resisted them, and were swept up by them. Literature, philosophy and history give us different, though related, ways of understanding the process and the experience of reform and revolution in human history.

IDS Courses: Literature and History

IDS 174 01 Cultural Heritage II: Lit/Hist
Montano, Jesus MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM
Indigenous: Native American Literature and History in (What Came to Be Called) North America

Chronologically our course begins at the height of the Aztec Empire and proceeds through the colonial period, the ages of nation building and manifest destiny, and finally ends in the Now. In order to avoid the pitfalls of a straight linear chronology, however, our route will begin in modern Mexico with the Zapatista and other indigenous movements. We will proceed back into history, going through the nationalism and colonial periods all the way back to the eve of the Conquest in Mexico. At this point we will venture across the Border, and while staying in the past, we will explore Native American creation stories and the various ways in which people made sense of their relationships to each other, to the world, and to the divine. We will continue on this road, traveling from the early period of contact with Europeans toward the US colonial period and then to the era of expansion and Manifest Destiny. Our course will end by examining modern Native American authors who look back toward the past as a way of discussing modern US issues. The goal of our travels is to understand our cultural inheritance, sometimes through the lens of Western European thought and culture but most time in juxtaposition to it, through the disciplines of history and literature. We will look carefully at governmental treaties and historical events, as well as the thoughts and ideas governing both inter-cultural and intra-cultural dialogue.

IDS Courses: Literature and Philosophy

IDS 175 01 Cultural Heritage I: Lit/Phil
Peterson, Anna MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM
The Invention of Love: Ancient Conceptions of Love and their Influence

This course will explore the theme of love in the literature and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome. Throughout the course, our discussion will be guided by the following questions: How do we define love? What is the relationship between love, desire, and faith? What role, if any, can love play in education? And how have ancient conceptions of love influenced modern ones? We will consider these questions through five thematic units: family; friendship and education; erotic love; patriotism; and Christian love. Readings will span from roughly 600 B.C. to A.D. 400 and include: Sappho, Euripides, Plato, Catullus, Ovid, Vergil, and Augustine, Bishop of Hippo. Alongside these ancient sources we will also read C.S. Lewis’ Four Loves, a Christian theologian’s discussion of love heavily indebted to the Greco-Roman tradition, and Tom Stoppard’s The Invention of Love, a modern play about the influence of Latin love poetry on the English poet, A.E. Housman. In both cases, these texts will provide us with a useful point of comparison for our own interpretations of the ancient views of love. As a result of the readings and the class discussions, you will not only deepen your understanding of the rich cultural heritage behind contemporary discussions of love, but also challenge preconceived ideas of what love is and the role that it plays in relationships and society.

IDS 175 02 Cultural Heritage I: Lit/Phil
Peterson, Anna MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM
Classical Mythology and Plato's Republic

Classical Mythology is an invaluable component of the literature, art, and thought of the western world because it provided a great variety of stories for authors to read and adapt for their own artistic, literary, or intellectual purposes. From the ancient authors themselves to modern theater and film, the stories of the ancient world have captured our minds and imaginations for centuries. But myths are not only stories. Myths project a world-view, an ideology, a unique perspective on how ancient Greek and Roman societies lived and how they viewed their own cultures. This course will attempt to occupy the space in between: a careful study of the ways in which the Greeks and Romans used their myths, what those myths have to say about the world and the people that produced them, and also why those myths still capture our attention today. The main texts we will be reading are drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy: Homer’s Iliad, Plato’s Republic, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Despite the fact that each of these texts propose radically different views about the nature of storytelling, they are all still concerned with the same perennial questions: the role of humanity in the universe, the influence of the gods in the human world, what is heroic action, the question of what happens to us after death, the differences between the sexes and if love really makes the world go round. Using these texts as our guides, we will examine not only how the ancient Greeks and Romans approached these questions, but how we too may (or may not) use them in our own search for the truth.

IDS 175 03 Cultural Heritage I: Lit/Phil
Maiullo, Stephen TR 1:30 PM 2:50 PM
Classical Mythology and Plato’s Republic

Classical Mythology is an invaluable component of the literature, art, and thought of the western world because it provided a great variety of stories for authors to read and adapt for their own artistic, literary, or intellectual purposes. From the ancient authors themselves to modern theater and film, the stories of the ancient world have captured our minds and imaginations for centuries. But myths are not only stories. Myths project a world-view, an ideology, a unique perspective on how ancient Greek and Roman societies lived and how they viewed their own cultures. This course will attempt to occupy the space in between: a careful study of the ways in which the Greeks and Romans used their myths, what those myths have to say about the world and the people that produced them, and also why those myths still capture our attention today. The main texts we will be reading are drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy: Homer’s Odyssey, Plato’s Republic, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Despite the fact that each of these texts propose radically different views about the nature of storytelling, they are all still concerned with the same perennial questions: the role of humanity in the universe, the influence of the gods in the human world, what is heroic action, the question of what happens to us after death, the differences between the sexes and if love really makes the world go round. Using these texts as our guides, we will examine not only how the ancient Greeks and Romans approached these questions, but how we too may (or may not) use them in our own search for the truth.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 230 Ancient Philosophy
Bassett, Gregory TR 1:30-2:50

This course is an introduction to Western philosophy from its beginning in ancient Greece to Europe during the Middle Ages. Philosophy is the “love of wisdom” or the quest for meaning. Philosophy addresses what might be called the “big questions” of human existence: Who am I and what is real? What is the source of my existence and the existence of the world? What is my purpose and how ought I live in order to achieve it? How can we achieve happiness as individuals and as a society? What is happiness and what is a just society? What is the best way to answer these questions in order to acquire knowledge? Can we acquire knowledge? What is knowledge? In this course we will look at the ways in which the greatest thinkers in our early cultural history -- Pythagoras, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Epicurus, Plotinus, Augustine and Aquinas -- have attempted to answer these questions and to frame a meaningful view of human existence and the world we inhabit.

PHIL 232 Modern Philosophy
Dell'Olio, Andrew TR 9:30-10:50

This course is an introduction to philosophical thought in the west during the modern period of our cultural history, a period characterized by its attempt to break away from traditional forms of authority, whether religious, social, or intellectual. Authors to be studied include Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Pascal, Voltaire, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. The philosophers we will encounter in this course responded to the challenges of cultural change by formulating new conceptions of reality, knowledge, religion, the self, morality, the meaning of life, and the very nature of philosophy itself. These philosophers not only altered the way we view the world, but they put forward ideas that continue to challenge our common ways of thinking.

PHIL 295 World Philosophies
Dell'Olio, Andrew TR 12:00-1:20

This course is an introduction to philosophy in a global context. We will consider the classical philosophical traditions of Greece and Rome, India, China, and Japan. We will be mostly concerned with the great texts of these philosophical traditions and what they have to say about humanity’s perennial questions: What is real? Who am I? What can I know? How should I live? What is the nature of the Divine? What is enlightenment and how can I achieve it? We will attempt to understand the answers offered to these questions by the great minds and texts of these traditions with some attention to each tradition’s cultural and historical context. We will also compare and contrast the answers provided by each tradition with an eye to what each one has to offer us today for our own quest for wisdom.

History Courses

HIST 130: Introduction to Ancient Civilization

Focused on significant developments in history from Greek origins through the Renaissance. Designed to introduce the discipline of history. Can be used to fulfill part of the cultural heritage requirement, and flagged for global learning international.

Sections available Spring 2013:
01 Introduction to Ancient Civilization
Prof. Albert Bell; T 6:30 PM – 9:20 PM
02 Introduction to Ancient Civilization
Prof. Albert Bell; TR 1:30 PM – 2:50 PM
03 Introduction to Ancient Civilization
Prof. Anna Peterson; MWF 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

HIST 131: Introduction to Modern European History

Focused on significant developments in modern European history from Renaissance to our own time. Designed to introduce the student to the discipline of history. Can be used to fulfill part of the cultural heritage requirement, and flagged for global learning international.

Sections available Spring 2013:
01 Introduction to Modern European History
Prof. Fred Johnson; TR 12:00 PM – 1:20 PM
02 Introduction to Modern European History
Prof. Fred Johnson; TR 9:30 AM – 10:50 AM

HIST 208 01 World Civilizations II: 1500-Present
Prof. Jonathan Hagood; MWF 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM

Surveys developments in human civilization in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe since 1500. Employs comparative methods to investigate cultures and societies that developed in different parts of the world. Examines the ways in which world societies have interacted in the past and present. It fulfills the Cultural Heritage II requirement and is flagged for global learning international.

English Courses

ENGL 231 01 Literature Western World I
Hemenway,Stephen MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM

Aesop's fables and Homer's tales of war and adventure start us on an oddysey of ancient literature. Ancient Roman and medieval Italian epics send us on a spiritual journey that also embraces excerpts from the Hindu Bhagavad Gita and the Islamic Koran. Chaucer takes us on a pilgrimage with the Pardoner and the Wife of Bath, and Cervantes inaugurates a quest with Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Sappho, Lady Murasaki, Marie de France, and Sor Juana de la Cruz go places where few females dare to tread. Michelangelo and Shakespeare lead us through the Renaissance and Reformation and prepare us for the modern world. As you study these authors and works, you will read and write about the masterpieces of Western literature in a global context.

ENGL 232 01 Literature Western World II
Verduin,Kathleen MWF 2:00 PM 2:50 PM

This is a course in the classics of European literature from approximately 1600 up to (well, almost) the present. Alternating narrative and drama (and throwing in some representative poems along the way), we will consider the seventeenth century’s response to a radical reorganization of Christianity; the Enlightenment’s allegiance to rationality and satire; the Romantic era’s return to emotion and the fantastic; Realism’s portrayal of marriage and money; the fascination with myth and the primitive in the early twentieth century; the Existentialist writings highly popular at mid-century and in postwar academia; and, maybe, the rise of the art film as literature’s stepchild. Although it is of course impossible to do justice to four hundred years of literary production in a mere four months, we will endeavor to gain some continuity by tracing Joseph Campbell’s mighty archetype of the Hero’s Journey.

Texts (available as individual paperbacks) will include Bunyan, Pilgrim’s Progress; Racine, Phaedra; Voltaire, Candide; Sheridan, The School for Scandal; Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Goethe, Faust, Part I; Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilych; Ibsen, A Doll’s House; Hesse, Demian; works by Sartre and other Existentialists, still to be selected; and probably a film or two by the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. Three tests, three critical essays, weekly reaction papers. THIS COURSE SUBSTITUTES FOR IDS 172 AND HELPS MEET THE SECOND (“MODERN”) HALF OF THE CULTURAL HERITAGE REQUIREMENT.

ENGL 233 01 Global Literature
Cole,Ernest MW 2:00 PM 3:20 PM

The contact between western societies and the so–called “Third World” has led to the creation of a number of discourses that have shaped and continue to shape the literary cannons of both societies and the relationship between scholars and writers of the two distinct traditions. This initial contact has led to, for instance, the discourse of imperialism and its representation of indigenous peoples and societies as “other” or “different.” The socio-cultural and political assumptions that go with these labels have shaped western consciousness of other peoples as well as contributed to the emergence of a body of work and criticism that seek to deconstruct western hegemony, control and domination by writing back to former colonialists and their literature.

This course would focus on how former colonized societies from Sub-Saharan Africa to South Asia, the Caribbean and South America react to this discourse of “otherness” and their attempts at de-colonization and promoting their political and cultural independence. In the process, this form of literature would “write back to empire” by addressing issues as destruction of indigenous cultures, representation of otherness, identity, alterity, and gender.

Thus, in this course, we would examine works that cover a considerable period of growth and development in time and place in Global Literatures from Lewis Nkosi’s Mating Birds in Africa to George Lamming’s In the Castle of My Skin in the Caribbean. Within this historical framework, we would trace the impact of westernization on it the literature, and its reconfiguration of colonial perceptions of indigenous societies in the process of writing back to empire.

Selected Texts
1. Lewis Nkosi: Mating Birds
2. Luis Alberto Urrea: The Devil’s Highway
3. Endo, Shusaku: Silence
4. George Lamming: In the Castle of My Skin
5. Norman R. Shapiro: Negritude: Black Poetry from Africa and the Caribbean