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History Courses
>
Disciplinary Courses
140 History Workshop
495 Seminar in History
   
>
European History
after 1500
131 Introduction to Modern European History
206 British and Irish
History Since 1700
240 Enlightenment/
Nationalism in Europe
242 Twentieth Century Europe
248 Europe in the Age
of Reformation
280 Colonizers and Colonized: Perspectives on
Modern Imperialism
341 World War II: Collaboration and Resistance
344 Genocide in the
Modern World
371 Paris and Shanghai:
A Tale of Two Cities
   
> History Prior to 1500
130 Introduction to Ancient Civilization
205 British and Irish
History to 1700
210 The Greek World
215 The Roman World
218 The Middle Ages: Europe, Byzantium, and Islam
285 Women in Antiquity
312 Myth and Culture in
Pre-Colonial Africa
   
> Non-Western History
207 World Civilizations I: Prehistory to 1500
208 World Civilizations II: 1500 to Present
221 Colonial and
Post-Colonial Africa: African Perspectives on Colonialism
225 West African Economy and Society, 18th-20th Centuries
260 History of Latin America Since 1810
263 Colonial Latin American History
270 Modern China
280 Colonizers and Colonized: Perspectives on Modern Imperialism
312 Myth and Culture in Pre-Colonial Africa
321 The Making of
Modern Africa
364 Latino Identities: Ethnic Diversity in Latin American and U.S. History
365 Gender and Power in Latin American History
370 Modern Middle East
   
> United States History
160 U.S. History to 1877
161 U.S. History Since 1877
175 Michigan History
251 Revolutionary America: Visionaries, Rebels,
and Ruffians
252 Civil War America: Disruption & Destiny
255 World War I America:
A Nation in Transition
256 Recent America: The Challenge of Power
351 Slavery & Race in America, 1619-present
352 U.S. Women &
Social Change
355 U.S. Foreign Policy, 1898-present
357 U.S. Cultural History: Ideas of Race, Gender, and Class
361 U.S. Military History: Rise of a Warrior Democracy

 

 

What courses do history majors take at Hope College?

The History Department offers a series of basic survey courses. In addition to these, the Department contributes to and accepts courses from the Cultural Heritage interdisicplinary sequence (IDS 171 and IDS 172). A wide variety of upper-level courses are offered every semester.

Below is a list of descriptions of the courses that faculty in the Department will offer in the fall.

Fall 2014

HIST 130 01: Intro Ancient Civilization
Bell, Albert
TR 1:30 - 2:50 PM

Focused on significant developments in history from Greek origins through the Renaissance. Designed to introduce the discipline of history. Can be used to fulfill part of the cultural heritage requirement, and flagged for global learning international.

HIST 130 02: Intro Ancient Civilization
Bell, Albert
T 6:30 - 9:20 PM

Focused on significant developments in history from Greek origins through the Renaissance. Designed to introduce the discipline of history. Can be used to fulfill part of the cultural heritage requirement, and flagged for global learning international.

HIST 131 01: Intro Modern European History
Staff, TBA
TR 9:30 - 10:50 AM

Focused on significant developments in modern European history from Renaissance to our own time. Designed to introduce the student to the discipline of history. Can be used to fulfill part of the cultural heritage requirement, and flagged for global learning international.

HIST 140 01A: Debating American Diversity
Petit, Jeanne
MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM
Who should be allowed to migrate to the United States? Who should be allowed to become a citizen? What does it mean to be an American? These questions have been paramount to Americans, especially between 1840 and 1920, as millions of immigrants arrived from Europe, Asia and the Americas. Some people began to feel that the very foundations of American identity were threatened, while others saw the immigration as the fulfillment of the American Dream. In this class, we will examine the ways men and women in the United States debated American identity during this time of great change. But the central goal of this class is not simply to understand the history of these debates. Instead, we will use these debates to introduce you to what it means to do history. We will learn how to read primary and secondary sources, how to come up with research questions, how to find and use historical sources, how to document those sources and how to write a piece of historical scholarship.

HIST 160 01: U.S. History to 1877
Staff, TBA
TR 1:30 - 2:50 PM

This survey course examines the rise of the American nation from its colonial origins through the Civil War and Reconstruction. The approach is thematic and special emphasis is placed upon the impact of European contact with Native Americans, the establishment and abolition of slavery, the struggle for women’s equality, the influence of industrialization, westward movement, the evolution of republican institutions, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the nation’s gradual rise to prominence.

HIST 175 01: Michigan History
Hagood, Jonathan
T 9:30 - 10:50 AM

This course is a survey of Michigan History to the present and is primarily designed for students majoring in education. The main objective of this course is for students to demonstrate an understanding of the chronology, narratives, perspectives, and interpretations of Michigan history from its beginnings to the present. To this end, students will: examine relationships, including cause and effect, among important events from the era; identify the sequence of these events and describe the setting and the people affected; analyze and compare interpretations of events from a variety of perspectives; and assess the implications and long-term consequences of key decisions made at critical turning points in Michigan history. Flagged for global learning domestic.

HIST 175 02: Michigan History
Hagood, Jonathan
T 12:00 - 1:20 PM

This course is a survey of Michigan History to the present and is primarily designed for students majoring in education. The main objective of this course is for students to demonstrate an understanding of the chronology, narratives, perspectives, and interpretations of Michigan history from its beginnings to the present. To this end, students will: examine relationships, including cause and effect, among important events from the era; identify the sequence of these events and describe the setting and the people affected; analyze and compare interpretations of events from a variety of perspectives; and assess the implications and long-term consequences of key decisions made at critical turning points in Michigan history. Flagged for global learning domestic.

HIST 200 01B: World War II and the Making of Modern America
Petit, Jeanne
MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM

This class explores the many ways World War II fundamentally transformed the United States. We will learn how the U.S. went from a nation that embraced isolationism to a nation that emerged as “Leader of the Free World,” from a nation mired in depression to a nation that became an economic powerhouse, and from a nation that could not pass an anti-lynching bill to a nation that was on the verge of the Civil Rights Movement. Some of the major issues we will analyze include strategies in the Pacific and European theaters, the leadership of FDR and his generals, the internment of Japanese Americans, “Rosie the Riveters” in wartime industry, the struggle of African Americans for a “double victory,” and the decision to drop the atomic bomb. Overall, we will analyze how the war reshaped American political, social, economic, military and cultural institutions. Two credits, second half of the semester.

HIST 200 02B: Christian Histories
Baer, Marc
TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM

What does it look like to do history Christianly? In this course we’ll read and discuss three recent books written by historians who are believers, as they reveal insights into the enterprise of the Christian historian. One book addresses approaches to thinking about history, the second an event, and the third connects history and biography. At the end of the course students will write a reflective essay on the relationship between the Christian faith and the life of the mind as applied to the practice of doing history.
Two credits, second half of the semester.

HIST 207 01: World Civilization I
Janes, Lauren
MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM

This introductory world history course surveys developments in human civilization in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe from prehistory until about 1500. It employs comparative methods to investigate cultures and societies that developed in different parts of the world, and it examines the ways in which world societies have interacted in the past. It fulfills the Cultural Heritage I requirement and is flagged for cultural diversity.

HIST 207 02: World Civilization I
Janes, Lauren
MWF 11:00 - 11:50 AM

This introductory world history course surveys developments in human civilization in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe from prehistory until about 1500. It employs comparative methods to investigate cultures and societies that developed in different parts of the world, and it examines the ways in which world societies have interacted in the past. It fulfills the Cultural Heritage I requirement and is flagged for cultural diversity.

HIST 210 01: The Greek World
Bell, Albert
R 6:30 - 9:20 PM

The ancient Greeks created many elements of our cultural heritage—philosophy, drama, democracy, to name a few. But contradictions, such as a democracy based on slave labor and ruled by a “first citizen,” lie behind the beautiful buildings and the dramatic victories over larger forces. This course explores the rise of Greek culture to its height in the fifth century B. C. and its evolution into the Hellenistic world that prepared the way for the Roman Empire. Flagged for global learning international.

HIST 248 01: Europe: Age of Reformation
Gibbs, Janis
MWF 11:00 - 11:50 AM

In the 16th and 17th centuries, Europeans fought over many things—religion, politics, territory, and wealth, just to name a few. The social and political landscape of the continent was shaped by conflict. In this course, we will examine the varieties of conflict in European society, and analyze their causes and effects. In addition to considering actual wars (including the Thirty Years’ War, the French wars of religion, the Ottoman invasions of Europe and the English Civil War), we will look at conflicts that did not involve actual warfare, and see how Europeans resolved—or failed to resolve—their differences. Students should expect to complete at least twenty pages of polished writing for this class. Flagged for global learning international.

HIST 280 01: Perspectives of Modern Imperialism
Baer, Marc
TR 9:30 - 10:50 AM

The roots of globalization can be traced back to the outcomes of modern imperialism. This course will focus on trying to understand the rise and fall of the British and other European empires in Africa and Asia. Through secondary texts, novels, primary sources and films we’ll examine modern imperialism simultaneously from the perspective of the colonizer and the colonized, and evaluate the impact of imperialism on European and global societies. History 280 can be used to fulfill either the non-western or post-1500 requirements for the History major and minor.
Flagged for cultural diversity and global learning international.

HIST 357 01: U.S. Cultural History
Petit, Jeanne
MWF 12:00 - 12:50 PM

Spanning the years from the Civil War through the late 20th century, this course examines the ways both ordinary people and elites created, challenged and shaped American culture. Students will consider cultural history on two levels. First, we will explore changes in the ways American men and women of different classes, races, and regions expressed themselves through popular and high culture—including entertainment forms like vaudeville, world’s fairs, novels, and movies as well as movements like the Harlem Renaissance and Fundamentalism. Second, we will analyze the influence of cultural ideas on political, economic and social changes, such as fights for African-American and women’s rights, the emergence of consumerism, social struggles during the Great Depression, participation in World War II, the protests of the 1960s, and the rise of conservatism in the 1980s. Students will learn the various ways historians interpret cultural phenomena and then do their own interpretations of cultural phenomena in an extensive research paper. Flagged for global learning domestic.

HIST 371 01: Paris & Shanghai
Tseng, Gloria
MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM

This course explores the histories of two major metropolises—Paris and Shanghai—in the 19th and 20th centuries. By extension, it will also introduce us to the histories of modern France and modern China. We will examine the ways in which the histories of the two countries intersected—the rise of the two cities as symbols of modernity in their respective parts of the world; the French colonial presence in Shanghai; the two cities’ experiences of enemy occupation during WWII; and Shanghai as a place where many Europeans made their fortunes, found a refuge from political calamities, or lived lives of adventure. Students will actively engage in the process of learning by preparing and writing a fifteen-page research paper and working on a class project involving research. Hence, the contents of the course will be partially pre-determined by the professor and partially shaped by the research of the students. Flagged for global learning international.

HIST 499 01: History Internships
Baer, Marc
TBD

This course is a practical experience for students. It enables them to apply the knowledge, research methods, and writing skills acquired in the academically oriented setting to concrete projects such as the Joint Archives, the Holland Historical Trust or an oral history undertaking. Application is made to the chairperson of the Department of History. Supervision and the number of credits earned are determined by the nature of the project.


 

 

Why study history?

Where can a history degree take you?

Who are the historians at Hope?

What courses are students taking this semester?