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Marc B. Baer
Professor of History (1983)

616.395.7589
Lubbers Hall 329
126 East 10th Street
Holland, MI 49423
baer@hope.edu

B.S., Iowa State University, 1967
M.A., University of Iowa, 1971
Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1976

Marc Baer specializes in modern British history. His regular courses include British and Irish History to 1700, British and Irish History Since 1700, Modern Imperialism and the History Seminar. He also teaches in the Cultural Heritage (Introduction to Modern European History), and Senior Seminar (Exploring Faith and Calling) programs, and on occasion the History Workshop. His research focuses on the cultural, social and political history of Britain—especially London—since the late 18th century, and on Christianity in modern Britain. Baer's first book, Theatre and Disorder in Late Georgian London (Oxford University Press, 1992) uses the longest-running theatre riot in British history to unpack the relationship between theatrical and political cultures. His second book, The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster 1780-1890 (PalgraveMacmillan, 2012) is a cultural and political study of the West End of London between the French Revolution and World War I. His third book, Mere Believers: How Eight Faithful Lives Changed the Course of History (Wipf and Stock, 2013). It represents the first of two projected books on major Christian figures in Britain c. 1750-1950. Besides his teaching and research Baer helps organize the Hope College Veritas Forum, and was the founding director of the College's Pew Society (now named Kleisis), which equips Hope students to consider and prepare for graduate school and university teaching careers.

For more information go to http://www.marcbaer.net

 

Courses Taught

HIST 131 Introduction to Modern European History
HIST 140 London Histories
HIST 280 Colonizers and Colonized
HIST 205 British and Irish History to 1700
HIST 206 British and Irish History Since 1700
HIST 495 History Seminar: Britain, 1870-1930
IDS 473 Exploring Faith and Calling

 

Current Research

Victorian Believers: Eight More Faithful Lives that Changed the Course of History

 

Publications

Mere Believers: How Eight Faithful Lives Changed the Course of History (Wipf and Stock, 2013).

(with William Pannapacker), "Should Students be Encouraged to Pursue Graduate Education in the Humanities?" Journal of Markets & Morality, 2012

The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster, 1780-1890 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)

"King George III (1738-1820)," Encyclopedia Virginia http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/George_III_1738-1820

Student Online Learning Center to accompany R. R. Palmer, Joel Colton and Lloyd Kramer, A History of the Modern World, 10th ed. (2006) http://highered.Mcgraw-hill.com/sites/00731068925/student_view0/

“From ‘first constituency of the empire’ to ‘citadel of reaction’: Westminster, 1800-1890," in Anthony Taylor and Matthew Cragoe (eds.), London Politics, 1760-1914 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)

“Political Dinners in Whig, Radical and Tory Westminster, 1780-1880,” in Richard Davis, Clyve Jones, and Philip Salmon (eds.), Partisan Politics, Principle and Reform in Parliament and the Constituencies, 1689-1890 (Edinburgh University Press, 2005)

“Sir Francis Burdett,” in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)

Student Online Learning Center to accompany R. R. Palmer, Joel Colton and Lloyd Kramer, A History of the Modern World, 9th ed. (2002)

“The Ruin of a Public Man,” in James Morwood and David Crane (eds.), Sheridan Studies (Cambridge University Press, 1995)

Theatre and Disorder in Late Georgian London (Oxford University Press, 1992)

“The Memory of the Middle Ages: From History of Culture to Cultural History,” Studies in Medievalism, 1992

“Means and Ends: Computers in the History Classroom,” in Proceedings of the 1988 Humanities and Education Conference (Michigan Council for the Humanities, 1989)

“An Infinite Diversity: Religion and Pseudoreligion in Modern Britain,” Christian Scholar’s Review (June, 1989)

The Pre-Industrial City: Population and Society in Renaissance Florence (Hewlett-Packard, 1976; Laboratory for Political Research, University of Iowa, 1984)

“Political Parties of the United Kingdom,” in Vincent McHale (ed.), Political Parties of Europe (Greenwood Press, 1983)

“Guide to Machine-Readable Historical Data,” Resources in Education (December, 1981)

“Class and Community in Victorian Britain,” Journal of Urban History (August, 1979)

“Charles Tennyson D’Eyncourt,” in Joseph O. Baylen and N.J. Gossman (eds.), Biographical Dictionary of Modern British Radicalism (Harvester, 1978)

“Social Structure, Voting Behavior and Political Change in Victorian London,” Albion (Fall, 1977)

As well, he has given 37 papers or invited addresses, and published approximately 80 book reviews in such journals as Albion, American Historical Review, Fides et Historia, The Historian, International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Journal of British Studies, Journal of Modern History, Print Quarterly, Religious Studies Review, Social History Society Bulletin, and Victorian Studies.

 

 

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