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catalogue

CLASSICS COURSE OFFERINGS

CATALOGUE


CLASSICS

210. The Greek World

This course, which is cross-listed with History 210, surveys the major historical developments and literary figures of Greece from preclassical times to the end of the Hellenistic period.
Four Credits Bell Fall Semester, Alternate Years

215. The Roman World

This course, which is cross-listed with History 215, surveys major historical developments and literary figures from the foundation of the
Roman Empire to the fall of the Empire. Students who enroll for Classics 215 will write a paper on a literary topic; those who enroll for History 215 will write a paper on a historical topic. A knowledge of the Latin and Greek languages is not required.
Open to all students. Four Credits Bell Fall Semester, Alternate Years

250. Classical Mythology

This course introduces students to the sacred tales of the Greeks and Romans through ancient art and (in translation) literature. Much attention is also given to the afterlife of the myths in the postclassical world, from Renaissance painting to the cinema. A knowledge of the Latin and Greek languages is not required.
Open to all students. Maiullo Four Credits Spring Semester

280. Practicum in Classics

285. Women in Antiquity

This course surveys the status and accomplishments of women in the ancient Mediterranean world, from Egypt to the fall of the Roman Empire. It examines questions of matriarchy, marriage patterns, and attitudes toward women displayed in literature and art. Attention is given to problems of methodology and modern interpretations of ancient sources on this subject. A knowledge of the Latin and Greek languages is not required. Open to all students.
Four Credits Bell Spring Semester, Alternate Years

295. Studies in Classical Literatures and Cultures

This course is designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Two to Four Credits Both Semesters

495. Studies in Classical Literatures and Cultures

This course is designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Two to Four Credits Both Semesters

499. Internship in Classics

This course provides supervised practical experience in anthropology, archeology, paleography, numismatics and epigraphy. Normally junior status and the completion of at least a Classics minor are prerequisites. Although ordinarily taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program, students working together with faculty may make individual arrangements with a local host institution or organization. Following consultation with the off-campus coordinator, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail the program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. If possible, proposals should be finalized prior to the semester in which the internship will occur. The number of credits to be determined in consultation with instructor and chairperson. This course may be repeated for credit. Approval of the chairperson is required.
Both Semesters

GREEK

171. Ancient/Biblical Greek I

An introduction to the language spoken and written first in the ancient Greek world and later throughout the eastern Roman Empire. Students learn the elements of Greek grammar and vocabulary that are found in authors from Homer to the New Testament, with special emphasis on the latter. For students with no previous study of Greek. Four Credits Fall Semester

172. Ancient/Biblical Greek II

A continuation of Greek 171. Prerequisite: Greek 171. Four Credits Spring Semester

271. Greek III

A continuation of Greek I and II, with reinforcement of grammar and vocabulary. Selected readings from the Gospels and a number of Classical authors. Prerequisite: Greek 172, or equivalent. Four Credits Fall Semester

280. Practicum in Greek

Practical experience in the language in various contexts such as teaching Greek at the elementary level. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit. Prior permission of instructor and chairperson required.
Credits to be Arranged Both Semesters

295. Studies in Greek

371. Greek Prose

A course which focuses on reading and interpreting literary prose texts. Representative topics include Herodotus on the Persian Wars, some dramatic Athenian court cases, Thucydides’ observations on the causes and course of the great war between Athens and Sparta, and Plato’s perceptions on the life and teachings of Socrates. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated. Two Credits At Least Once a Year

372. Greek Poetry

The great works of Greek verse are the subject of this course. Representative topics include the heroes, gods and goddesses of Homer’s epics, the tragic dramas of Sophocles and Euripides, and the sometimes very personal musings of the Lyric poets. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
Two Credits At Least Once a Year

373. Koine Greek

A study of the Greek literature which flowers in the post-Classical era. Representative works include passages from the Septuagint, some apocryphal books, Josephus, writings of the Church Fathers, and especially the New Testament. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated. Two Credits At Least Once a Year

490. Special Authors

Material covered to vary, depending upon the needs and desires of those who elect the course. Prerequisite: Greek 271, or permission of
instructor. Two or Four Credits Both Semesters

495. Studies in Greek Language and Literature

A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Two or Four Credits Both Semesters

499. Greek Internship

LATIN

171. Latin I

An introduction to the language of the ancient Romans. After the fall of Rome, Latin remained the language of the liberal arts; until far into the modern era, the sounds of Latin were heard in every classroom, in every subject from biology to religion. This course places us in the shoes of centuries of college students, as the active use of Latin in the classroom helps us understand the ancient Roman world - as well as our own. Four Credits Reynolds Fall Semester

172. Latin II

A continuation of Latin 171. Prerequisite: Latin 171.
Four Credits Reynolds Spring Semester

271. Latin III

Basic Latin grammar and vocabulary are systematically reviewed as students are introduced to the writings of some selected authors, representing the range of literature composed in Latin from antiquity to the modern world. Prerequisite: Latin 172, or placement. Four Credits Fall Semester

280. Practicum in Latin

Practical experience in the language in various contexts such as teaching Latin at the elementary level. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit. Prior permission of instructor and chairperson required. Credits to be Arranged Both Semesters

371. Latin Prose

A course which focuses on reading and interpreting literary prose texts. Representative topics include the speeches Cicero delivered against Catiline, Sallust’s essays on the corruption of the Republic, and life in Nero’s Rome, whether seen through the eyes of the historian Tacitus, or in the pages of Latin’s oldest novel. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated. Two Credits At Least Once a Year

372. Latin Poetry

Masterworks of Latin verse are the subject of this course. Representative topics include the comic plays of Plautus, Roman love poetry, Vergil’s Aeneid (perhaps the most influential book, after the Bible, of Western civilization), and the tragedies of Seneca. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
Two Credits At Least Once a Year

373. Medieval and Neo-Latin

A look to the literature written in Latin since late antiquity. Representative topics include Jerome’s translation of the Bible, tales from medieval Ireland, John Calvin’s Institutio, African Voices (Latin poetry composed by ex-slaves), and contemporary Latin. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated. Two Credits At Least Once a Year

490. Special Authors

Material covered to vary, depending on the needs and desires of those who elect the course. Prerequisite: Latin 271, or permission of
instructor. Two or Four Credits Both Semesters

495. Studies in Latin Language and Literature

A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Two or Four Credits Both Semesters

499. Latin Internship

Any questions?
Feel free to ask one of us to look over your own situation. It's possible, for instance, to do the work of a Latin for Teaching minor within a Classical Studies major.

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