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Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Scholars Program
in the Arts and Humanities
Hope College
Holland, MI 49422-9000

 

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholars
Program in the Arts and Humanities

Student Profile: Daniel Owens

 

Q&A with Daniel Owens:

Why did you apply to Mellon Scholars Program?
As a history major, I viewed the program as a unique opportunity to develop my research skills while cultivating strong relationships with professors across the disciplines. I was also intrigued by Mellon’s emphasis on using digital technology to share scholarly work.

What have you found most challenging about it?
For me, the first tutorial was the most challenging aspect of the program to date. I had never conducted “scholarly research”, that is, written a paper that makes an argument. Thus, nearly all the techniques and skills addressed during the semester were new to me.

How do you think your experience in the program has contributed to your experience at Hope College?
Through my participation in the Mellon Scholars Program, I have acquired a firm foundation of critical thinking, research, and writing skills. Further, Mellon has provided me with an array of opportunities to engage with professors from a variety of disciplines. I have thoroughly enjoyed learning from their different perspectives and look forward to maintaining these relationships even after I graduate from Hope.

What are your most significant accomplishments as a Mellon Scholar (i.e., projects, presentations, grants)?
Presenting my paper on Thabo Mbeki’s “African Renaissance” at the 2011 Arts and Humanities Colloquium was probably the academic highlight of my sophomore year. It was my first opportunity to present in a scholarly forum and prepared me well for my presentations this spring at Notre Dame, NCUR, and the International Studies Association Annual Convention in San Diego.

What do you expect to do beyond your time at Hope College?
I plan to pursue a Masters degree in International Relations or African Studies. Ultimately, I hope to work for an international organization on issues broadly related to conflict resolution in Africa.

What advice would you give to a student who is considering the program?
Take full advantage of the opportunities you have to work one-on-one with professors. They are a wealth of knowledge and will be a great asset for you both in your research and in your development as a person.


Daniel Owens in Mellon News and Events:

Daniel Owens will present his paper on peacekeeping in Liberia at the Annual meeting of the Academic Council on the UN System. June 13-15, 2012.
The Academic Council on the United Nations System

Daniel Owens, as well as Matt Keller, will present "Global History" at the Hope College History Department Colloquium. April 12, 2012.

Daniel Owens, "American Foreign Policy During Periods of System War:
Learning From Long-Term Trends in an Effort to Minimize
the Prospects of U.S. Involvement." April 1-4, 2012.
International Studies Association Annual Conference

Daniel Owens, “The Hybridization of Peacekeeping: The United Nations Mission to Liberia Revisited.” April 13, 2012.
Celebration for Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance

Daniel Owens, "The Hybridization of Peacekeeping: The United Nations Mission to Liberia Revisited" Accepted by 2012 NCUR, January 6, 2012
National Conference on Undergraduate Research

Mellon Scholar Daniel Owens's Research Project Accepted by the 2012 HDC Conference, November 21, 2011
The Fourth Annual Human Development Conference at the University of Notre Dame

Daniel Owens, "Thabo Mbeki’s African Renaissance: A Transformative Vision for African Development?," April 15, 2011.
Eight Mellon Scholars present projects at Celebration for Undergraduate Research.