2012 MAY/JUNE/JULY OFF-CAMPUS COURSE OFFERINGS

Click on section headings to go to course descriptions

 

I.         Domestic Off-Campus Courses

COMM 395: Creativity & Innovation and the Entrepreneural Ecosystem in Silicon Valley (Spielvogel)

            EDUC 488: Rural Education in Northern Michigan (Yelding)

EDUC 488: Rosebud Indian Reservation - Cross-Cultural Education (Cherup, Piers)

            REL 295/IDS 200/IDS 495: Pine Ridge – Learning and Serving Among the Oglala

Lakota: Conversations about Faith, Culture and Worldview (Hoogerwerf)

            REL 365: Ecological Theology and Ethics (Bouma-Prediger)

           

II.        International Off-Campus Courses

BIOL 380: Field Studies in the Peruvian Amazon (Greij)

CLAS 495: Experiencing the Eternal City, Rome (Maiullo, Allis)

COMM 395: Community & Sacred Sense of Place, Scotland (Johnston/Anderson)

EDUC 282: Literacy II: Reading and the Language Arts, Grades 4-8, Liverpool (Donk, Pardo)

IDS 172: Cultural Heritage II, China (Lunderberg)

IDS 280: Contemporary Issues in Japan (Hodson, A Nakajima, E Nakajima)

IDS 174: Health and Healing in the Western Tradition, Querétaro (Hagood and Scheerhorn)

MGMT 358/ECON 358/IDS 495: Management in the British Economy (Smith)

REL 480: The Indian Worldview (Wilson)

            SPAN 124: Intensive Introductory Spanish (and Span 295)

            SPAN 295: Mexican Literature, History, and Culture, the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (Kallemeyn)

            SPAN 495: Galician Literature, History, and Culture, Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Dorado)

 

 III.       Vienna Summer School (see special application information)

      First Session (register for May term):

      ART 111 or 295/HIST 131 or 295: Austrian Art and Architecture

      GERM 101: German I

      HIST 131 or 295: Modern Austrian History

      IDS 172: Empires of the World, Empires of the Mind

      MUS 101or 295/HIST 131 or 295: Vienna’s Musical Traditions

      REL 260: Theology and Ethics

 

            Second Session (register for June term):

      ART 111 or 295/HIST 131 or 295: Austrian Art and Architecture

COMM 295: Intercultural Communication

ECON 211 or 395: Economic & Business Issues in the European Union

      GERM 102: German II

      IDS 172: Empires of the World, Empires of the Mind

      IDS 495: Senior Seminar – Vienna: Values in Transit

      MGMT 395: Economic & Business Issues in the European Union

      REL 260: Theology and Ethics

            Independent Study Projects

 

 

 

 

International Off-Campus Courses

 

 

BIOL 380Peru 

Field Studies in the Peruvian Amazon

Instructor(s): Dr. Eldon Greij, Dr. David Bruggers 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 5-27, 2012

 

This course focuses primarily on tropical community biology, including rivers, lakes, rainforest, and coastal marine. High species diversity of the tropics will be demonstrated by studying birds. Monkeys, sloths, and other animals will be observed and their habitat requirements studied. A cultural component will be provided by studying and exploring the Incan centers of Cusco, the Sacred Valley, and Machu Picchu.  Trip includes seven days on a river boat on the Amazon and staying at a jungle lodge. 

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $3,795

 

 

 

CLAS 495 - Rome

Experiencing the Eternal City: A Mayterm in Rome, Rome, Italy

Instructor(s): Steve Maiullo, Jim Allis 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 9 – June 3, 2012

 

Rome is one of the most fascinating archaeological sites in the world. Beginning as a city founded by pig-farmers, Rome became the capital of the Roman Empire and the center of Christian Europe. The remnants of its rich history exist simultaneously. The Vatican, for example, was built on the site of the Circus of Nero, where, reportedly, Saint Peter was crucified upside down. Thus ancient and modern, Italian and Roman, and Christian and pagan make up the rich tapestry of this most fascinating of cities.

 

This course opens a dialogue between the various ways to approach and experience the city, both ancient and modern. We will explore the topography of the city of Rome through the interaction between archeological, material evidence and ancient written, literary accounts (especially of the Augustan authors Propertius, Livy, Virgil and Ovid) and how their experiences compare and contrast with, and potentially even influence, later approaches to the city (especially in the Christian period). Students will be invited to compare their experience of the city with those described in the ancient world.  That is, we will examine how the ancients laid out their city, how the ancients wrote about their city, and how, as Rome became Christian, religious and intellectual changes transformed the face of the city.

 

Within this methodology we will examine the typologies and topographical relationships of structures and spaces in ancient Rome, from early Republic to the Christian period. We will examine the distribution patterns of public monuments and urban topographical narratives via the interrelation of literary and archaeological evidence. We will combine a historical survey of the development of various functions of urban spaces, such as the Roman Forum, with a literary survey of the texts that describe them.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $4425

Expenses Not Covered:  Airfare, Food

 

 

 

COMM 395 or IDS 495 - Scotland

Communication, Community and Sacred Sense of Place, Scotland

Instructor(s): Johnston/Anderson 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 10 - May 30, 2012

 

Comm 395 and IDS - Senior Seminar

The purpose of the Scotland May Term is to study intercultural communication in-depth in another culture.  The study of intercultural communication within the  communication discipline addresses how identity, history, and cultural communication norms affect interaction, understanding and relationships.   Cultures differ in numerous communication variables, such as the expression of emotion, directness, listening styles, nonverbals, linguistic framing, relational expectations, and conflict style.  Cultures also vary on cultural communication dimensions (identified by Hofstede), such as individualism/collectivism, low/high power distance, masculinity/femininity, high/low contact, high/low context, etc.  These cultural dimensions can create communication barriers and misunderstandings. 

 

Scotland affords students the opportunity to engage cultural communication differences without language barriers, and it also offers students the opportunity for a life changing study/travel experience in faith, communication and community with the Iona Christian Community.   The Scotland May Term addresses four broad themes:  community in faith, non-violent communication, sacred listening, and sacred place.   Students will study how these themes are reflected in the everyday lives of Scottish people, and how these themes are constructed through everyday speech practices.  Through this process, students will develop an appreciation for travel as a vehicle for outward exploration as well as inward growth and realization.  

 

Senior Seminar

This course will examine the many ways we connect with one another and create community – face to face and online.  We will critique our consumer society, consider ways to reweave the social fabric when it has worn thin, reflect on the possibilities of virtual community, then travel to Scotland to learn about different types of communities there, and experience the gift of Christian fellowship at Iona. Readings, discussion, short essays and a world-and-life-view paper will provide a framework for reflecting on where you live (geographically and virtually) and what you live for.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $2550

Expenses not Covered:  Airfare

 

 

 

EDUC 282Liverpool, England

Literacy II: Reading and the Language Arts for Grades 4 -8, Liverpool, England

Instructor(s): Tony Donk, Laura Pardo 

June Term, Dates of Course: June 2-24, 2012

 

EDUC 282/82 Literacy II: Reading and the Language Arts for Grades 4 - 8

 

The focus of this course is on the transitional reader.  It is during grades 4 through 8 that the child will become an independent reader in the elementary or middle school classroom.  Building on the foundation provided in Literacy I (ED 280), topics covered will include content area reading, comprehension instruction, assessment, and instructional models.  Additional attention will be paid to designing and conceptualizing instruction that meets the needs of all students. Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education program.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $4,300

 

 

 

IDS 172 - China

May Term in China, Beijing, Harbin, Shanghai CHINA

May take for Cultural Heritage I or II, Fine Arts I, Biology or Senior Seminar credit

Instructor(s): Marla Lunderberg, Jianhua Li 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 12-June 3 in China

 

Walking through Tiananmen Square.  Observing the world from atop the Great Wall.  Wandering through the historic Yuyuan Gardens.  Studying the massive shift in commerce and world power from west to east.  These are some of the experiences you can have with a select group of Hope students studying in Beijing, Harbin, and Shanghai, China in May, 2012.

 

Experiential learning will be the key.  Our travels will combine morning lectures with afternoon field trips, and you will have the opportunity to get to know and work with Chinese university students, who will join us on many of our adventures.  No previous experience in Chinese language is required--although if you have studied Chinese and hope to further develop your studies, we will find a way to assist you in achieving this goal.

 

Assignments will include pre-departure readings, regular attendance at all lectures and field trips, journaling and a research paper focusing on your particular area of study.

 

4 credit hours will be earned and can be applied to your choice of discipline. (Your choice will determine the topic of your research paper):  Cultural Heritage I or II, Fine Arts I, Biology or Senior Seminar

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $5050

 

 

 

IDS 174Querétaro, Mexico

Health and Healing in the Western Tradition, Querétaro, Mexico

Instructor(s): Jonathan Hagood, Mary Scheerhorn 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7 - June 1

 

This course examines the Western cultural heritage from the perspectives of health and healing. You will learn about changes in health care since the 16th century, the development of the healing professions, and the economics of the modern health sector. You will also read selections from the full scope of literary genres – including poetry, fiction, plays, and memoirs – reflecting a diversity of voices that address a myriad of conditions, topics, and issues pertaining to health and healing.

 

After spending three days on campus getting a firm foundation in the history of medicine and clinical skills, the course moves to Querétaro, Mexico where you will spend two weeks in health clinics and hospitals under the supervision of either the Nursing Department (for nursing students) and the School of Medicine (for pre-med, pre-PA, and other pre-health majors) of the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (UAQ) and a member of Hope’s Nursing Faculty. During this time, you will live with a host family, practice your Spanish-language skills, and travel on guided excursions outside of Querétaro.

 

The course will deepen your understanding of the rich cultural heritage supporting contemporary perspectives on health and healing and show you how to incorporate history, literature, creative writing, and spirituality into a reflective healing practice. The time spent in Mexico will challenge your pre-existing beliefs and opinions concerning the human body, its well-being, and the role that society and individuals play in health and healing.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $2,502

 

 

 

IDS 280 – Japan

Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Japan

Leaders:  Robert Hodson, Andy and Emma Nakajima

May Term, Dates of Course:  May 15 - June 11

 

This seminar serves as an introduction to the rich cultural traditions of Japan.  A series of lectures and field trips as well as personal contact with Japanese students will give a unique perspective on various aspects of contemporary Japanese society.

 

Classes are held on the campuses of Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo and Yokohama.  The university setting allows Hope students to observe and participate in student activities on the campus and interact informally with university students, especially those who have visited Hope College or who plan to come to Hope’s campus the following September.  The class lectures focus on the study of culture and religion, social and economic issues in Japan, Japanese education, as well as some “survival” Japanese lessons.  Class content is reinforced with field trips to an elementary school and relevant business, social service, religious and historical sites.  Students are housed in the central area of Tokyo with easy access by train or subway to museums, commercial and shopping areas and cultural centers.

 

An important aspect of the program is an optional weekend home stay with a Japanese family.  Usually Japanese families entertain guests outside of their homes, so this is a special opportunity to learn about Japanese home life first hand.

 

Since one cannot fully understand contemporary Japan without understanding its historical and cultural traditions, the participants will travel to the historic and cultural centers of Japan.  Near Tokyo these centers include Nikko, with its famous ornate architecture, and Kamakura, site of the great outside Buddha and many temples and shrines.  The last week of the program we will travel to such places as Kyoto, which offers 2,000 years of history; Hiroshima, site of the Peace Memorial Park, a tribute to the victims of the atomic bomb; and Mt. Fuji, the most beautiful, highest mountain in Japan.  Knowledge of the Japanese language is not required.

 

All participants will earn 4 credits for IDS 280.  Students who are interested in earning extra course credits can register for an additional 2- 4 credits.  Credits may be substituted for some general education requirements (RL2, FA2, S2A, CD, CH2).  Substitution forms must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office.

 

Approximate Cost of Course (includes tuition for four credit hours, lodging, meals, field trips, and airfare):  $4,800

 

 

 

MGMT 358, ECON 358, IDS 495 - London

Management in the British Economy (IDS -- Management Themes and Values), England

Instructor(s): Thomas Smith and TBD 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7 to May 28, 2012

 

This interdisciplinary course explores the economy, politics and culture in Britain as they influence values and attitudes toward business and business practices. Seminars with leaders of business, labor and government are conducted in London and various other locations in England. Organizations visited in recent years have included  United Biscuits, Goldman Sachs, Herman Miller, The All England Tennis and Croquet Club (Wimbledon), The Bank of England, Trades Union Congress, the BBC, and Parliament. Special attention is paid to unique forms of management and business organizations as well as the role of the UK in the European Union. The program also places emphasis on cultural experiences including theatre, concerts, art galleries, and museums. 

 

An optional trip to Paris for four days is a regular feature of the program.

 

The course, intended for Economics, Management, and Accounting majors and minors, may be used to fulfill requirements for the Management and Economics majors, the Senior Seminar (when taken as IDS), and general electives.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $3,500

Expenses Not Covered:  Airfare

 

 

 

REL 480 - India

The Indian Worldview, India

Instructor(s): Boyd H. Wilson 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 9- June 6, 2012

 

The purpose of this travel-seminar, A View of the Indian World: The Indian Worldview, is to  introduce the student to the world of India as well as the world of meaning that is assumed in India. Although there will be extensive travel and sight-seeing during the three and a half weeks in India,  the emphasis will not be on tourism exclusively.  The goal of the travel-seminar is to experience India with understanding:  this involves learning about India and experiencing India, not just seeing India.  A necessary part of the travel-seminar is an on-campus seminar that will meet for one hour a week during the Spring semester.  If a student is planning to make the journey to India during the May Term, the pre-travel seminar, Rel. 480:  The Indian Worldview, must be taken.  This seminar is offered for one hour of credit and is a necessary part of the travel-seminar in India. The time and place for this seminar will be arranged once all interested participants have enrolled (Wednesday night from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. has often been the time for this seminar).  The itinerary includes the following cities:  Delhi, Jaipur, Mumbai, Bangalore, Tirucchirappali, Madurai, Chennai, Mahabalipuram, Kolkata, Varanasi, Agra.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $3,950

 

 

 

­­­SPAN 124 - Intensive Introductory Spanish, Querétaro, Mexico & Hope College

SPAN 295 - Mexican Literature, History, and Culture, Querétaro, Mexico & Hope

Instructor(s): Sylvia Kallemeyn 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7 - June 9

 

SPAN 124 - Intensive Introductory Spanish in Queretaro is designed primarily towards your development of a comfortable, communicative knowledge of Spanish at the 2nd semester college level while gaining insight into and experiencing important aspects of Mexican culture.  In addition to meeting everyday as a class, the immersion experience provides numerous opportunities for Spanish language practice through lodging with host families, exploring the city, and weekend excursions.  Emphasis in class is on all four language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. It is helpful to have some prior spanish experience.  Credits: Spanish language (4)

 

SPAN 295 - Mexican Literature, History, and Culture (taught in English)

Course Description:  The course is a survey of Mexican history and culture through informational and literary texts written in Spanish.  The historical survey covers Pre-Hispanic Mexico, the Conquest, Independence and the Mexican Revolution.  Cultural topics include women in Mexican society, issues in education, and religion in contemporary culture.  Coursework includes readings from renowned Mexican and Latin American authors, as well as informational texts, plus field trips to historical sites and museums of art.  Credit: Cultural Heritage II or Cultural Diversity (4)

 

This course is limited to 14 students.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $1,665.00

Expenses Not Covered:  Airfare

 

 

 

SPAN 490 - Galicia, Spain

Galician Literature, History, and Culture, Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Instructor(s): Liliana Dorado 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7, 2012- June 1st, 2012

 

This course, hosted by the Universidad de Santiago, is a survey of Galician history and culture. The historical portion covers the study of the different populations and cultures that crossed paths in Galicia, eventually determining the makeup of the region as we see it today. Special attention will be given to the history of Santiago de Compostela, the final destination of the St. James’ Way.  Cultural topics will include women in Galician society, issues in education, and religion in contemporary culture. You will read renowned Galician and Spanish authors, informational texts and participate in field trips to historical sites and art museums.

 

During this time you will live with a host family and practice your Spanish-language skills.  You will take guided excursions in Compostela to churches, markets, museums and installations of the university.  Weekend trips will allow you to see Roman buildings and bridges, Celtics ruins, as well as the very special geography of coastal Galicia with its Rias Bajas and Rias Altas.

Santiago offers many free cultural activities. In the evening you can find “tunas” --traditional university student music bands--, folk groups, bag pipe players and street performer of all sorts. There is a lot to see just by walking through the city.

Credits:  Cultural Heritage or Cultural Diversity (4)

 

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $2815

Expenses Not Covered:  Airfare

 

 

 

Domestic Off-Campus Courses

 

 

COMM 395 - Silicon Valley

Creativity, Innovation, and the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Silicon Valley, San Francisco, CA

Instructor(s): Christian Spielvogel 

June Term, Dates of Course: June 4-June 29

 

COMM 395:  Creativity, Innovation, and the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Silicon Valley (cross-listed with MGMT & LDRS pending approval)

 

Where do great ideas come from and how do innovations spread to change the world in which we live?  Bestselling author Steven Johnson argues that innovations are produced in “liquid networks” or ecosystems -- places where constellations of curious people gather to shape and reshape extant ideas into new forms through collaboration, debate, competition, and experimentation.

 

This course is intended as an introduction to innovation and the process of entrepreneurial thought and action.  Students do not have to feel compelled to think of themselves as “entrepreneurs in training,” per se.  Rather, the course will enable students to envision themselves as capable change agents who can return to their communities armed with the tools and confidence to start something new, whether it be a campus organization, worship community, new website, or a venture that can take root as part of the Hope Entrepreneurship Initiative summer fellowship program.

 

 America’s unquestioned hub of twenty-first century innovation is located in the San Francisco Bay Area (a.k.a “Silicon Valley”), home to the largest concentration of entrepreneurs in the world, and birthplace to some of the most transformative ideas and companies in the post-World War II era.

 

While students will live in California for the month of June to study the process of how ideas travel from their origins to “scale,” we will bring with us the habits of tending to mind, body, and spirit that are cultivated daily through a Hope College education.  Each day will provide us with opportunities to develop our minds through guest lectures and discussions, site visits, networking events, group projects, and colloquiums; opportunities to maintain our health and well-being by walking, hiking, and biking our way through some of the area’s majestic surroundings, including San Francisco’s legendary and hilly downtown streets, the Golden Gate Bridge, Golden Gate Park, and nearby Yosemite National Park; and opportunities to sustain our faith through service projects and periods of worship.

 

The course can help everyone incorporate the “best practices” of innovation and entrepreneurship into their own communities (many of which are located in Michigan and the broader Midwest), while critiquing those aspects of the Silicon Valley’s entrepreneurial ecosystem that might not be congruent with the pace and priorities of life in the Midwest.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $2568

 

 

 

EDUC 488 – Covert, Michigan

Rural Education

Instructor(s): John Yelding 

May Term, Dates of Course: 05/07/12 - 06/01/12

 

This course provides students with an immersion experience in the rural education environment.  Participants will spend four weeks working directly with students.  Under the guidance of skilled educators, they will plan and deliver their own lessons, grade papers, assess student progress and assume responsibility for a variety of aspects of classroom management. 

 

Those who have participated in the program describe it as “confirming of their calling to be a teacher,” “a great opportunity to reflect and grow,” and “powerfully insightful as to what it is really like to be a professional educator.”  This class is open to all students who have successfully completed Educational Psychology (EDUC 220/221) or have received instructor approval.

 

With the completion of additional work and approval by the Registrar’s Office, this course can be substituted for some general education or major requirements.  See Professor Yelding for details.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $175

 

 

 

EDUC 488-02 - South Dakota

ROSEBUD INDIAN RESERVATION:  CROSS CULTURAL EDUCATION, Missions, SD

Instructor(s): Professor Susan Cherup and Professor James Piers 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7-25, 2012

 

Practice experiences are essential for anyone planning a career in education, social work or nursing.  Immersion into the world, lives, and culture of the Lakota Sioux provides great learning opportunities, increased cultural awareness and is good for the spirit.  When the two are mixed, they define the Hope College May Term on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, located in south-central South Dakota.

Begun in 1991, this experience allows students to live and learn in a culture different from their own and to participate full time in a classroom, school social work or counseling office or school nurse environment of their choice.  Information learned in college classes is applied to real life settings as students plan culturally appropriate lessons, cooperative learning activities, address a variety of learning styles, and help students deal with life events, traumas or health concerns.  Credits from this experience may be applied to a Religion 4 credit class, a Senior Seminar, an elective course for a Language Arts Composite major, Social Studies Composite major, Fine Arts Composite major, an Encounter with Cultures class, Cultural Heritage II or an elective for the Social Work major.

 

Orientation to the culture includes meeting with tribal, school, dormitory, and business representatives, hospital administrators, spiritual leaders, and Indian students. Trips to Wounded Knee, Crazy Horse, Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore, and the Akta Lakota and St. Francis museums provide further information about the Sioux Nation.

 

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $1,150

 

 

 

REL 295 - Pine Ridge, South Dakota

Learning and Serving Among the Oglala Lakota:  Conversations about Faith, Culture, and Worldview, Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota

Instructor(s): Steven Hoogerwerf 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7-25

 

Approved Course Credit also includes: 

IDS 200 Encounter with Cultures

IDS 495 Senior Seminar

 

The Pine Ridge May Term is a service-learning course on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.  The reservation is home to the Oglala Lakota Sioux, with a tribal membership that totals 17,775.  After a one week on-campus orientation course, participants will spend two weeks on the reservation, engaged in an ongoing service project, a variety of encounters with members of the reservation, travel to important sites on the reservation, the study of Lakota history and religion, and guided conversation to bring our own culture, faith and experience into conversation with life on the reservation. 

 

Our host on Pine Ridge will be the staff of an organization called RE-MEMBER (http://www.re-member.org/).  Their mission statement reads “Guided by the aspirations of the Oglala Lakota Indian communities we serve, RE-MEMBER seeks to improve the quality of Indian reservation life through relationships, shared resources and volunteer services. Through site visits and cultural immersion, we continue to develop a growing circle of advocates standing in solidarity with the Indian people of Pine Ridge, South Dakota.”

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $1,500

 

 

 

REL 365 - Adirondacks

Ecological Theology and Ethics, Hope and the Adirondacks

Instructor(s): Steve Bouma-Prediger 

May Term, Dates of Course: May 7-25

 

In this off-campus course students will study the nature and causes of current ecological degradation, the witness of Christian scripture and tradition concerning matters ecological, the duties and responsibilities of humans as earthkeepers, and the practical implications of living in a more earth-friendly way.

 

This course combines traditional academic study with a wilderness backpacking, canoeing, and whitewater rafting trip. Students learn wilderness camping skills and develop their leadership abilities in addition to examining issues in ecological theology and ethics.

 

The first two days of the course are at Hope, followed by two weeks in the Adirondacks of upstate New York, with the remaining 3-4 days back at Hope.

 

Approximate Course Fee (not including tuition): $975


 

 

 VIENNA SUMMER SCHOOL, 56th ANNUAL PROGRAM (4 credits/session)

 

Director:   Stephen Hemenway, English Department

Associate Director:  Janis Gibbs, History Department

Full Program:  May 8 to June 21

First Session (Actual Orientation & Classes):   May 9 to May 30

Second Session (Actual Orientation & Classes):  May 30 to June 20

 

In 2012, the Hope College Vienna Summer School will celebrate its 56th year.  This summer’s two sessions are open to qualified applicants of any age who have completed at least one year of college at an accredited institution.  The minimum grade point average for acceptance is usually around 2.80 but varies each year.  Normally, a student on disciplinary probation is ineligible. The program has a maximum of 55 students per session.

 

The academic program features twelve courses and the option of independent studies, each for four semester hours of credit.  Students may enroll for one course in either one or both of the two consecutive sessions.  Enrollment for most courses is limited to fifteen students; a course with low enrollment may be canceled.  Non-Hope students receive Hope College transcripts which are sent to their home colleges for transfer of credit.   Full tuition (included in the overall cost) is charged whether a class is audited or taken for credit.

 

Classes are held at the Austro-American Institute of Education in the heart of Vienna.  German-language courses are taught partly in German with English explanations of grammar.  All other classes are taught in English and require no previous study of German. 

 

Dr. Stephen Hemenway will lead the program for the 37th consecutive year.  The first-session group will depart from Grand Rapids or Chicago to Vienna on Tuesday, May 8.  Students may fly directly to Vienna apart from the group but must arrive by 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, May 9, to join the bus ride to Mörbisch, a seaside village near the Austro-Hungarian border, for orientation.  A similar group flight for second-session attendees will leave Grand Rapids on Tuesday, May 29.  Those arranging their own transportation must arrive in Vienna by 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, May 30, for orientation. 

 

In addition to the orientation sessions, Dr. Hemenway will lead weekend excursions to Salzburg (Austria) and Prague (Czech Republic) during the first session and weekend trips to Budapest (Hungary) and the Austrian Alps, as well as a day trip to Bratislava (Slovakia), during the second session.  Return flights from Vienna on May 31 and June 21 have been reserved, but other return cities and dates can be arranged.

 

Applications, scholarship forms, and a special four-page color brochure are available from Ms. Kendra Williams (Room 116 in the Fried International Center, Martha Miller Center (kwilliams@hope.edu); Dr. Stephen Hemenway (Lubbers 310 or hemenway@hope.edu); Dr. Janis Gibbs (Lubbers 330 or gibbs@hope.edu); Dr. David Cunningham (CrossRoads Office or cunningham@hope.edu); or the English Department Office (Lubbers 338).

Pre-Thanksgiving applications are encouraged; some classes fill quickly.  November 30 is the deadline for application for early admission and/or scholarships. Acceptances letters (for those with completed applications that include letters of recommendation and transcripts) will be mailed between December 6 and 9.  Scholarship recipients (those who have also completed scholarship applications, essay, and financial statement) will be notified between December 6 and 9.  Rolling admissions will take place after that date.  January 10 is the deadline for scholarship winners to accept or reject offers and pay deposits.  January 13 is the deadline for deposits for others accepted in December.  Final deadline for applications (if openings are still available) is January 24.

 

First Session Orientation and Classes—9 May to 30 May

 

German I stresses basic skills necessary to communicate in German.  Students earn credit for German 101, the first component of the Second Language general education requirement.  Prof. Karen Kalser, free-lance teacher and mother of four, has taught in the program since 1996. 

 

Vienna’s Musical Traditions focuses on Vienna's contributions to classical music and opera (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Bruckner, Strauss, Mahler, Schönberg).  Students may get credit for Music 295 or History 295 or fulfill the Arts I (Music 101) or Cultural Heritage II (History 131*) general education requirement.  Dr. Wolfgang Reisinger, a Viennese native with Ph.D. degrees in Music from the Universities of Vienna and Kansas, is director of the Vienna Church Music Conservatory and organ consultant for the Vienna Archdiocese.  He composed music sung during Pope Benedict XVI’s 2007 visit to Austria.  Student homework includes attendance at the world’s finest operas and concerts.

 

Modern Austrian History fulfills the Cultural Heritage II (History 131*) general education requirement or is an elective (History 295).  The course focuses on Austria from the decline of the Habsburg Empire, through both World Wars, up to Austria’s entry into the European Union.  Dr. Herberth Czermak--Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire, professor-emeritus at the University of Vienna’s Institute for Translators, and teacher for many American programs overseas--has taught in the Vienna Summer School since 1987.  Museum visits, walking tours, and films make Austrian history come alive in this course. 

 

Austrian Art and Architecture focuses on the rich treasures of the Baroque and Rococo, for which Vienna provides an ideal setting.  Austrian artifacts from Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Biedermeier, and Modern periods are also examined.  Many classes occur in museums, palaces, monasteries, and churches.  Students may earn credit for Art 295 or History 295 or fulfill the Arts I (Art 111) or Cultural Heritage II (History 131*) general education requirement.  Dr. Beatrice Ottersböck, noted art historian and Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, has taught in numerous American programs here since 1968.

 

Empires of the World, Empires of the Mind fulfills the Cultural Heritage II general education requirement (IDS 172).  Incorporating literature, philosophy, and history from the 16th to the 20th centuries, the course examines cultural and intellectual developments of Central Europe from the Holy Roman and Austro-Hungarian Empires to the formation of modern Austria.  Readings include fiction (Kafka), history (Morton), drama (Harrison), philosophy (Kant, Nietzsche), and cultural criticism (Freud).  Dr. Janis Gibbs, Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, specializes in the interplay of religious, social, and cultural factors in early modern German cities. 

 

Theology and Ethics: An Illustrated Guide fulfills the Religion 200-level general education requirement (Religion 260).  It examines Christian beliefs about God, creation, evil, and salvation, as well as their implications for Christian ethics.  Students read key biblical texts and theological commentaries and take field trips to churches, museums, and performances to learn how the arts exemplify theological themes. Dr. David S. Cunningham--Ph.D. from Duke University, Professor of Religion, and Director of Hope’s CrossRoads Project--focuses on the intersection of theology and the arts as one of his academic specialties. 

 

*History 131 counts for CH II if a student has taken or will take IDS 171 or IDS 175 for CH I.  Consult the Hope College Catalog and your advisor.

   

Second Session Orientation and Classes—30 May to 20 June

 

German II, a continuation of German I with Prof. Karen Kalser, is designed to develop the acquisition of a comfortable communication knowledge of German.  Students earn credit for German 102, the second component of the Second Language general education requirement.  German 101 or its equivalent is a prerequisite.

 

The Austrian Art and Architecture course is offered during this session by Dr. Ottersböck (see description under First Session).

 

The Empires of the World, Empires of the Mind course is offered during this session by Dr. Gibbs (see description under First Session).

 

The Theology and Ethics:  An Illustrated Guide course is offered during this session by Dr. Cunningham (see description under First Session).

 

Economic and Business Issues in the European Union fulfills the Social Science I (Block B) general education requirement as Economics 200 or 211 or a major elective requirement as Economics 395 or Management 395.   This course provides an understanding of the underlying economic principles and policies of the European Union and examines the impact and implications of the EU and its single currency on businesses and people in Europe.  Readings, discussions of current events, talks from experts, and field trips explore these issues under the guidance of Prof. Brian Gibbs (Hope alumnus), lecturer and Ph.D. candidate at Regensburg University in Germany.  With 20 years of experience in strategy and operations consulting to businesses worldwide, Gibbs has served many vital roles in the summer school since 1985. 

 

Vienna: Values in Transit celebrates its 24th year as a Senior Seminar course (IDS 495).  Students in this values-oriented class listen to and question the philosophies and life choices articulated by daily speakers from Austria and other countries.  Distinguished artists, business people, clergy, environmentalists, politicians, teachers, and World War II veterans and victims share their life stories.  Under the guidance of Dr. Stephen Hemenway (Ph. D. from University of Illinois), students interact with speakers and each other, write journals, and formulate personal views for a "Philosophy of Life" paper.   Prerequisite:  at least second-semester junior status.

 

Independent Study Projects

Independent Study Projects that make specific use of the Vienna locale are possible during either session, but second session is preferable.  A project, worth four hours of credit, is an alternative to listed courses; fluency in German is an advantage.  Prior approval (with project goals and outline) must be obtained from the appropriate department and from Dr. Hemenway, who arranges meetings with Austrian resource persons and supervises the project. Former students have pursued independent studies in creative writing, political science, education, sociology, theater, film, music, religion, and German literature.

 

Scholarships and Financial Aid

 

About $35,000 is available in scholarship awards for Vienna 2012.  One scholarship application suffices for a student applying for any of nine endowed funds:  Jurries Family, Gibbs Family, Fried, Mitsos, Fritz, Hemenway, Snow, Cady-Blom, and Austrian Faculty Funds.   A student applying for any of the first six funds must have the scholarship application signed by someone in his/her Financial Aid Office to verify financial need.  Each applicant must also submit a creative essay; see blue scholarship application for specific details.  Last year more than 20 students received partial scholarships ranging from $500 to $3000.  Scholarship application forms are available from Dr. Stephen Hemenway, the English Department Office, or the Fried International Center.  Students may also check with Financial Aid to determine eligibility for guaranteed student loans and other aid possibilities.

 

Program Costs

 

1.   Both Sessions with Weekend Trips - $6,700*

Included are tuition for eight semester hours of academic credit, non-credit German   language instruction, housing, breakfast and dinner every day (including weekends), tram-bus-subway passes in Vienna, orientation and farewell festivities, and all field trips or excursions required for courses in which the student is enrolled.  Also included are train and/or bus transportation, hotels, guides, admissions, and special events for weekends in Salzburg and Prague during first session and for weekends in Budapest and the Austrian Alps and a day trip to Bratislava in second session.  The student enrolled for both sessions saves $500. 

 

2.     First Session only with Weekend Trips - $3,700*

Included are tuition costs for four semester hours of academic credit, etc. (see everything listed in first sentence in #1), plus costs for weekend excursions for first session.

 

3.    Second Session only with Weekend Trips - $3,500*

Included are tuition costs for four semester hours of academic credit, etc. (see everything listed in first sentence in #1), plus costs for weekend excursions for second session.

 

4.         Round-Trip Flight Estimate:  (May 8 departure) $1,300-$1,425; (May 29

departure) $1,615-$1,655).  This flight fee, paid directly to a travel agent, is not part of the Hope College cost.  Return dates can be negotiated individually.

 

*The above cost estimates are based on prices and current exchange rates as projected in September 2011.  They may be revised if economic or political conditions change significantly.  Students should check the separate Vienna Summer School Brochure (it is also online) for more information on housing, cultural activities, etc.  

 

REGISTRATION and PARTICIPATION INFORMATION

 

Registration

 

  • Hope College Students (degree seeking) register beginning Wednesday, February 8 until course is full or begins.
  • Special non-degree seeking students may register beginning Monday, March 19 until course is full or begins.

 

Graduating?

 

§         If you need this course to graduate in July 2012, all work must be completed, graded and on your record by August 31.

§         If you are planning to graduate in May 2012, you must apply to take a summer class.  Forms are available in the Registrar’s office.

 

Senior Seminars - Students may register only if they have completed their junior        year. 

 

Fulfilling a General Education or Major/Minor Requirement

 

§         To receive credit for a general education or major requirement, other than the course for which you’re registered, you must complete a substitution form.  Forms available online or at Registrar’s Office  http://www.hope.edu/admin/registrar/FormsPDF/mjr-min-sub.pdf

        

Course Cancellations:  An eight-student minimum is required for each course.  Should a course be cancelled, students will be informed immediately so they may enroll in a different course.

 

Costs:  Listed course fees DO NOT include tuition except for Vienna Summer School.  Tuition rates will be announced in late January, 2012.  Costs shown are estimates based on current exchange rates and are subject to change.  Contact the course instructor for final course fees.

  • Students may participate in May, June, or July Off-Campus courses ONLY if their student account is current.
  • Fees and airfare will be refunded to the extent that the college can receive credit for expenses already incurred for the program.
  • Students auditing off-campus courses must pay the regular tuition rate.

 

Deposits and Payments:  The following schedule applies to all off-campus courses.  All funds are paid in the Office of Business Services.

 

            January 9         Deposit Due (non-refundable)*

                                          $300 International Off-Campus Courses

                                          $100 Domestic Off-Campus Courses                  

            February 24     Payment of airfare (if applicable)

            April 4              50% of balance due

            April 28            Remaining balance due

           

*Vienna Summer School requires a $300 deposit by January 22 for those accepted into the program.

 

Statement of Responsibility, Release from Liability:

All off-campus students must sign a statement of Responsibility, Release from Liability (available from the professor) prior to taking the course.

 

Information:  Contact the appropriate professor for details or stop by the Office of the Registrar, DeWitt first floor, 395-7760.

 

 

Vienna Summer School Application Information

 

Applications, scholarship forms, and a special four-page color brochure are available from Ms. Kendra Williams (Room 116 in the Fried International Center, Martha Miller Center (kwilliams@hope.edu); Dr. Stephen Hemenway (Lubbers 310 or hemenway@hope.edu); Dr. Janis Gibbs (Lubbers 330 or gibbs@hope.edu); or the English Department Office (Lubbers 338).

 

Pre-Thanksgiving applications are encouraged; some classes fill quickly.  November 30 is the deadline for application for early admission and/or scholarships. Acceptances letters (for those with completed applications that include letters of recommendation and transcripts) will be mailed between December 6 and 9.  Scholarship recipients (those who have also completed scholarship applications, essay, and financial statement) will be notified between December 6 and 9.  Rolling admissions will take place after that date.  January 10 is the deadline for scholarship winners to accept or reject offers and pay deposits.  January 13 is the deadline for deposits for others accepted in December.  Final deadline for applications (if openings are still available) is January 24.