American Ethnic Studies

A minor in American Ethnic Studies is designed to introduce students to critical methodologies and scholarly approaches to understanding the diverse historical and cultural issues relating to race and ethnicity in the United States.

At a time when America is becoming increasingly multicultural and when Americans are increasingly aware of the values of multiculturalism, participants in a minor in American Ethnic  Studies, both faculty and students, are encouraged to gain and develop skills to research, analyze and reflect on the heritage of racialized ethnic cultures in America. Such study will develop citizens, participants and activists who have views of their larger mission in life and who strive daily, both locally and globally, in the pursuit of justice and equality. Course requirements and options available to minor candidates are as follows:

Minors

American Ethnic Studies

A minor in American Ethnic Studies (AES) consists of 24 credits of coursework:

Minor candidates must complete 12 credits of foundational courses, 8 credits focusing on a specific American ethnic group (African American, Asian American, Latina/o American or Native American) and a 4-credit capstone course (3 credits for  an internship or research project and one credit for a capstone seminar). The capstone seminar course will include both meetings while enrolled for an internship or research project and utilization of assessment documentation from earlier courses intended to assure ongoing communication with each student declaring the minor and facilitation and implementation of the program’s assessment process.

I. FOUNDATIONAL COURSES (12 credits)

A. Introduction (4 credits required of all minors)

AES 210 – Introduction to American Ethnic Studies (4 credits)

B. Social Science (4 credits required from this area)

This requirement introduces students to the study of race and ethnicity in America from the Social Science perspective. Students may select from the following courses.

  • SOC 269 – Race and Ethnic Relations (2 credits) and PSY 110 – Race in America (2 credits) OR
  • COMM 371 – Communicating Across Difference: Intercultural and Gender Communication
C. Humanities (4 credits required from this area)

This requirement introduces students to the study of race and ethnicity in America from the Humanities perspective. Students may select from any of the following courses.

  • HIST 351 – Slavery & Race in America 1619-Present: The Struggle Within
  • HIST 357 – United States Cultural History: Ideas of Race, Gender and Class
  • HIST 251 – Revolutionary America: Visionaries, Rebels, and Ruffians
  • HIST 252 – Civil War America: Disruption and Destiny

II. AMERICAN ETHNIC GROUPS: IDENTITY AND SOCIAL REALITY (8 credits)

Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the reality of a particular ethnic group in the United States. Students must select one of the ethnic groups represented in A-D below on which they will focus their studies and must select two courses from within the ethnic category.

A. African American Studies
  • ENGL 375 – Religion, Race and Gender in the Literature of Antebellum America
  • ENGL 375 – African American Literature
  • HIST 351 – Slavery & Race in America 1619-Present: The Struggle Within (see Note 1 below)
B. Asian American Studies
  • ENGL 375 – Asian American Literature
  • ENGL 371 – History and the Asian Pacific American Novel
  • HIST 351 – Slavery & Race in America 1619-Present: The Struggle Within (see Note 1 below)
C. Latina/o American Studies
  • ENGL 375 – U.S. Latino Literature
  • HIST 351 – Slavery and Race in America (see Note 2 below)
  • HIST 364 – Ethnic Diversity in Latin America and U.S. History
  • PSY 305 – The Psychology of Latino Children
  • SPAN 344 – Modern Hispanic American Literature and Culture
  • SPAN 443 – Colonial Hispanic American Literature
D. Native American Studies
  • EDUC 488 – Cross-cultural Education - Native American Studies
  • REL 295 – Pine Ridge Oglala Lakota
  • IDS 174 – Native American Literature and Culture
  • HIST 160 – U.S. History to 1877

III. CAPSTONE REQUIREMENT (4 credits - 3 for internship or research, one as a capstone seminar)

This requirement can be met in either of two ways:

  1. An internship, approved by the AES director, in which students are immersed in a U.S. ethnic minority culture (preferably one involving the minority group emphasis chosen by the student) OR
  2. An extensive research project focusing on one of the ethnic minority groups in the United States (preferably one involving the minority group emphasis chosen by the student). The project can take either an interdisciplinary or disciplinary approach. The project must be approved by the AES director prior to the student beginning any formal research and must adhere to all aspects of the institutions research protocol.

Note 1: Students who selected this course to meet the Humanities requirement in the Foundations section must take the two other courses in this category to fulfill this requirement.

Note 2: Students who selected this course to meet the Humanities requirement in the Foundations section must take two of the other courses in this category to fulfill this requirement.

American Ethnic Studies

210. Introduction to American Ethnic Studies — This course will address the basic terminology of the field of American Ethnic Studies. Students will learn the meanings and various perceptions of culture, race, ethnicity, social class and gender. They will also develop an understanding of the relationships of all these concepts within both the individual and in society. These concepts will be analyzed through a multidisciplinary approach that examines both the social science and humanities contributions to these constructs. Various ways of thinking and approaches to research methodology will be explored.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

494. Capstone Seminar — This course consists of either an internship, approved by the AES director, in which; 1) students are immersed in a U.S. ethnic minority culture or, 2) an extensive research project focusing on one of the ethnic minority groups in the United States. The project can take either an interdisciplinary or disciplinary approach. It must be approved by the AES director prior to the student beginning any formal research and must adhere to all aspects of the institution’s formal research protocol.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chairperson
4 Credits | As Needed

  • Cho, Dr. DavidHope CollegeEnglish DepartmentAmerican Ethnic Studies

    Lubbers Hall-Room 335 126 East 10th Street Holland, MI 49423-3516

    Work616.395.7216

  • Yelding, JohnHope CollegeEducation DepartmentAmerican Ethnic Studies

    VanZoeren-Room 280 41 Graves Place Holland, MI 49423-3617

    Work616.395.7733