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College Advancement News


A Greater Hope Campaign

Endowed Professorships

Grants and Gifts

Department News

College Advancement Staff News

Faculty/Staff/Student Achievements

Current and Archived Press Releases for Hope College

Archived Advancement News 2001 - 2003

Archived Advancement News 2004 - 2006

Archived Legacies: A Vision of Hope Campaign News


A Greater Hope Campaign

 

October 14, 2011


Hope Announces $175 Million “A Greater Hope” Comprehensive Campaign

Hope College has launched the largest single fundraising effort in the college's history, a $175 million comprehensive campaign that will benefit every student as it adds several new buildings and provides major boosts to the college's endowment.

Hope announced the "A Greater Hope" comprehensive campaign on Friday, Oct. 14, in conjunction with the college's Homecoming Weekend and following the conclusion of the fall meeting of the college's Board of Trustees.

The effort will result in major enhancements to the campus and community landscape, including the construction of a concert hall and music building on Columbia Avenue at Ninth Street, an art museum on Columbia at 11th Street and a student center in the central campus adjacent to the historic Pine Grove. The endowment support will be equally significant despite being less visible, and will contribute $30 million for student scholarships and another $20 million for faculty-student collaborative research, a signature part of the Hope experience for which the college has repeatedly received national recognition across the years.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

A GREATER HOPE WEBSITE

 



A new student center planned for the heart of the Hope College campus will be named for presidential couple Jim and Martie Bultman (pictured). The center is supported by a $10 million lead gift from the Cheri DeVos VanderWeide family of Ada.

October 14, 2011


New Student Center to Be Named
for Jim and Martie Bultman

A new student center planned for the heart of the Hope College campus will be named for presidential couple Jim and Martie Bultman, who throughout their time at the college have placed students first.

Announced as part of the college's "A Greater Hope" comprehensive campaign on Friday, Oct. 14, the Jim and Martie Bultman Student Center will be constructed in the central campus, adjacent to Hope's Pine Grove. The 42,000-square-foot facility will provide dynamic, attractive space to promote student interaction and a myriad of events in exciting venues, and will serve as a beacon drawing students to their campus "family room."

The center is supported by a $10 million lead gift from the Cheri DeVos VanderWeide family of Ada. Cheri is a co-chair of the campaign.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

A GREATER HOPE WEBSITE


Endowed Professorships


August 25, 2011


Graham Peaslee and Charlotte
vanOyen-Witvliet Named to Professorships

Long-time faculty members Dr. Graham F. Peaslee and Dr. Charlotte vanOyen-Witvliet have both been appointed to endowed professorships at Hope College, succeeding colleagues whose tenure in the positions has concluded.

Peaslee has been appointed the Elmer E. Hartergink Professor of Chemistry. vanOyen-Witvliet has been appointed the John H. and Jeanne M. Jacobson Professor of Psychology.

In addition to recognizing faculty members for excellence, endowed chairs provide funding for summer research projects as well as some salary support. The college has a total of 20 endowed chairs for faculty and three endowed administrative positions.

First held in 2002, the John H. and Jeanne M. Jacobson Endowed Professorship is designated for a tenured faculty member with a commitment to the Christian faith who is an outstanding teacher-scholar or artist and who proposes to conduct a significant program of research or creative activity. The professorship is open to faculty from any department, with appointment for a four-year term. The professorship was established as a retirement recognition in honor of Dr. John H. Jacobson, who was 10th president of HopeCollege from 1987 to 1999, and his wife, Dr. Jeanne M. Jacobson, who was an adjunct member of the Hope education faculty and a senior research fellow with the college's A.C. Van Raalte Institute. It was previously held by Dr. Caroline Simon of the Hope philosophy faculty.

First held in 1995, the Elmer E. Hartgerink Endowed Professorship recognizes an outstanding chemist dedicated to students, teaching and research, and committed to the Christian faith. It was established by Elmer E. Hartgerink, a 1939 Hope graduate who spent his career as a chemist, serving in the latter part of his career as chair and chief executive officer, and then chairman of the board, of Wyckoff Chemical Company Inc. in South Haven. Hartgerink, who died in February 2000, received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the college in 1988. The professorship was previously held by its original recipient, Dr. William Mungall, who retired from the faculty at the end of June.

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August 17, 2011


Stacy Jackson and Anne Larsen Named
to New Endowed Professorships

Hope College has appointed two current faculty members to new endowed professorships beginning with the start of the coming school year.

Dr. Stacy L. Jackson has been appointed the Kenneth J. Weller Professor of Management, and Dr. Anne R. Larsen has been appointed the Lavern '39 and Betty De Pree '41 Van Kley Professor of French.

The two new endowments reflect the college's emphasis on adding more of the professorships to recognize outstanding faculty members, along with providing them with funding for summer research projects as well as some salary support. The college now has a total of 20 endowed chairs for faculty and three endowed administrative positions, and is seeking to establish more.

"An endowed professorship represents an advanced stamp of approval on professors who have proven their worth to the academy," said Dr. James E. Bultman, president of HopeCollege. "A major initiative at Hope has been to secure more endowed professorships that will reward, recognize and retain some of our most distinguished professors."

Bultman noted that the college is grateful to those who, as through the Weller and Van Kley professorships, help provide an exceptional education for students by supporting talented and dedicated faculty. "It's a very visionary act and generous act for a couple or person to establish an endowed professorship that will ensure long-term quality teaching, scholarship and attentiveness to the mission of the institution," he said.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


September 13, 2010


Stephanie Milanowski
Holds Sluyter Professorship

Hope Provost Richard Ray celebrates Stephanie Milanowski's appointment
to the Sluyter Professorship during the formal investiture ceremon
y.

Stephanie Milanowski of the Hope College art and art history faculty holds the college's Howard R. and Margaret E. Sluyter Endowed Professorship in the field of design.

Milanowski joined the Hope faculty in the fall of 2009 as an assistant professor of art. Milanowski has spent more than two decades working with a variety of clients in guiding design ideas from concept to market, experience that she brings to her classroom instruction. In addition to teaching at Hope, she currently works professionally as an art director, designer and consultant through Grand Rapids-based Stephanie Milanowski Design, which she established in 1999. Her emphases include digital media products as well as products and design for paper and giftware industries, corporate collateral, identity packages, annual reports, brochures, books, catalogs, and commissioned drawings for corporate and private collections and exhibition displays.

She teaches introductory and advanced design classes at the college. She has involved her students in preparing projects for local businesses and organizations to provide authentic experiences in bringing client-oriented assignments from initial planning through implementation. During 2009-10, such opportunities ranged from a competition to design a new beverage and promotional campaign for Lemonjello's in downtown Holland to preparing the 122-page booklet for the college's annual Celebration of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance.

Read the announcement



May 19, 2009



Maria Burnatowska-Hledin Appointed to the Frederich Garrett and Helen Floor Dekker Endowed Professorship

Dr. Maria Burnatowska-Hledin of the Hope College biology and chemistry faculty holds the Frederich Garrett and Helen Floor Dekker Endowed Professorship.

The professorship was established through the estate of Dr. Fred H. Decker and Marie V. Buranek Decker to provide financial support for a faculty member who has an established record of excellence in biophysics, biomedicine or biology. Dr. Decker was a 1921 Hope graduate.

The chair was established in the 1980s. Its first recipients were biologist Dr. Harvey Blankespoor, who held the chair from 1988 until retiring in 2002; and chemist Dr. Michael Silver, who held it from 2002 until retiring at the end of the 2008-09 school year.

Burnatowska-Hledin has been a member of the Hope faculty since 1992. Her research concerns the protein VACM-1/cul 5, seeking to understand the role that it may play in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells as well as cancer-induced angiogenesis (growth of blood capillaries).

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Library Director Kelly Jacobsma Appointed to Endowed Position

Kelly Jacobsma, who is director of libraries at Hope College, has been appointed the first recipient of the college's new Genevra Thome Begg Director of Libraries endowed chair.

A member of the Hope library faculty since 1988, Jacobsma became director of libraries on July 1, 2008, following the retirement of long-time director David Jensen. Her appointment to the endowed position will become effective on July 1, 2009.
In addition to recognizing faculty members for excellence, endowed chairs provide funding for summer research projects as well as some salary support. The college has a total of 19 endowed chairs for faculty and three endowed administrative positions.

Begg's interest in the college stemmed from the year early in the 20th century that her late husband Raymond had attended the high school that Hope had operated in its earlier decades. Married only 11 years prior to his untimely death in 1956, they had visited Hope and Holland together just once, because she wished to see one of the places in which he had spent his youth. From that single visit her relationship with and appreciation for the college grew.

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Todd Steen Appointed to
New Endowed Professorship

Dr. Todd Steen of the Hope College economics faculty has been named the first recipient of the college's new Granger Endowed Professorship in Economics, Management and Accounting.

The professorship is designated for an outstanding member of the faculty in the department of economics, management and accounting with a spiritually mature Christian faith whose teaching and actions are exemplary; and who makes a positive difference in the lives of Hope students, sharing his or her own Christianity to help them grow in their own faith, and the world beyond. It has been established by Ron and Donna Granger of Lansing, Mich. who are pictured with Prof. Steen.

In addition to recognizing faculty members for excellence, endowed professorships provide funding for summer research projects as well as some salary support. The college has a total of 19 endowed professorships for faculty and two endowed chaplaincies.

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"Leonard and Marjorie Maas Endowed Chair in Reformed Theology"
Supports Religion Program

September 4, 2007

A new endowed chair at Hope College emphasizes the faith tradition of which Hope is a part.

The new "Leonard and Marjorie Maas Endowed Chair in Reformed Theology" has been established to be awarded to a faculty member whose scholarly emphasis is on the historical and philosophical development of Reformed theology through the present day. The professorship has been donated by Leonard and Marjorie Maas of Holland, who are longtime supporters of Hope as well as lifelong members of the Reformed Church in America, the denomination with which the college is affiliated.

The chair's first recipient is theologian Dr. Mark Husbands, who joined the Hope religion faculty this fall and has made Reformed theology a central focus of his scholarship and teaching.

"The generosity of Leonard and Marjorie Maas to Hope College and the Reformed Church in America is a manifestation of their commitment to the Christian faith," said Dr. James Bultman, president of Hope College. "This endowed chair is yet another example of their joyful lives of gratitude and their desire to positively influence the Christian dimension of the college."

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Thomas Ludwig and Caroline Simon Appointed to Chairs

May 30, 2007

Hope College faculty members Dr. Thomas Ludwig and Dr. Caroline Simon have been appointed to endowed chairs at the college.

Ludwig, a professor of psychology, has been appointed to an eight-year term as the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology. Simon, a professor of philosophy, has been appointed to a four-year term as the John H. and Jeanne M. Professor of Philosophy.

They are each the second member of the faculty to hold their respective chairs. Their appointments will begin with the new school year.

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Tom Smith Appointed
to New Endowed Chair

June 27, 2006

Tom Smith of the Hope College faculty has been named the first recipient of the college's new Dr. Leon A. Bosch '29 Professorship in Business Management.

The chair is designated for an outstanding member of the faculty in the department of economics, management and accounting who has a strong interest in management and organizational development. It was established through the estate of Virginia French Bosch in memory of her husband, Dr. Leon A. Bosch '29.

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Susan Mooy Cherup
Appointed to Sonneveldt Chair

June 27, 2006

Susan Mooy Cherup of the Hope College faculty has been appointed to the college's Arnold and Esther Sonneveldt Endowed Professorship in Education.

The chair, first held in 1998, is designated for a member of the education faculty who is an outstanding teacher and demonstrates a commitment to the Christian faith and to preparing young people for the field of education. The chair was established in the Sonneveldts' honor by their family. It was originally and previously held by Dr. Leslie Wessman, who has retired from the college's education faculty.

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Grants and Gifts

September 26, 2011


Department of Energy Supports Development of Isotope Retrieval System

A major research grant to Dr. Graham Peaslee of the Hope College chemistry faculty from the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting a project that seeks to do some recycling at the atomic level.

Peaslee is leading an effort to develop a system for collecting leftover radioisotopes generated through the use of large particle accelerators. He noted that the material, which currently goes to waste, could then be put to a variety of uses depending on the type collected, from cancer treatments to detecting illicit nuclear activity abroad.

The U.S. Department of Energy has supported the project with an $840,000, two-year research award for nuclear chemistry that will take effect beginning in December.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


 

 

September 20, 2011


NSF Award Funds Purchase of
High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscope

Enabling users to write words in a space just a fraction of the width of a human hair isn't the purpose of the newest microscope coming to Hope College, but the capability reflects the precision and flexibility that will support multiple research programs in chemistry and physics as well as laboratory-based courses.

Hope has received a $214,750 award from the National Science Foundation's Major Research Instrumentation Program for an atomic force microscope that will be used in scanning probe microscopy at the college. The instrument, to be installed in November, will allow extremely magnified examination of a variety of materials, producing high-resolution, three-dimensional images detailed to the atomic level. Beyond topography, the instrument will measure properties like magnetic force, electric force and frictional force, and will allow additional manipulation of the samples.

The grant proposal for the atomic force microscope was co-authored by Dr. Mary (Beth) Anderson, assistant professor of chemistry, and Dr. Jennifer Hampton, assistant professor of physics. Both will be using the instrument in their on-going research projects conducted collaboratively with Hope students, as will three of their colleagues. The instrument will also find use in upper-level courses at the college.

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July 20, 2011


NSF Grant Funds Study of Molecular Dynamics and Research Tools

As he and his student researchers study the innermost workings of DNA and RNA, Dr. Brent Krueger of the Hope College chemistry faculty is as interested in improving the methods they're using as in the subject itself.

It's a dual-focused approach that he's pursued since joining the college's faculty in 2001. His work recently received a major boost through a three-year, $385,000 grant from the "Research in Undergraduate Institutions" (RUI) program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) that will help support his on-going project into 2014.

Krueger's team is studying the functioning of biomolecules called Hairpin Ribozymes in processes involving DNA and RNA. They are most interested in better understanding how changes to the Hairpin Ribozyme's structure during such processes relate to the way that it functions.

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July 20, 2011


Grant from ExxonMobil Supports
Schools’ Participation in REACH

For the third consecutive year, ExxonMobil has provided support for high school teachers and students to learn about the natural and applied sciences as participants in the summer research program at HopeCollege.

A $7,000 grant to the college is supporting the participation of students in Project REACH (Research Experiences Across Cultures at Hope) this summer. The award was presented at Hope on Wednesday, July 20, by Matt Van Zanten and Abigail Albers, representing J&H Oil, a local ExxonMobil branded fuels marketing distributor.

The REACH program is a six-week immersion for high school students and teachers engaging in challenging and relevant research projects with Hope's science, engineering and mathematics faculty. The goal is to provide meaningful learning experiences to the students as they consider their interest in pursuing careers in one of the STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields in college, and to involve teachers in research activity that they can in turn apply to their own classroom teaching. The emphasis has been on recruiting students who come from backgrounds underrepresented in STEM careers.

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February 15, 2011

Grant Supports Research to
Improve Parkinson’s Treatment

A grant from the Campbell Foundation of Grand Rapids is supporting Hope College neuroscientist Dr. Gregory Fraley in his ongoing research focused on improving the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson's Disease.

Fraley, an associate professor of biology, is working with researchers at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York City to study the effectiveness of a compound that may offset one of the drawbacks of the treatment: the potential to damage brain cells and in so doing limit its very effectiveness. The two-year award from the Campbell Foundation will provide a total of $50,000 in support from July 2011 through June 2013.

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be used for Parkinson's patients who no longer respond to drug therapy. The treatment involves implanting wired electrodes into the brain to deliver electrical stimulation to the areas in which the disease's tremors and other symptoms are believed to originate.

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Dr. Peter Gonthier works with student researchers
Caitlin Taylor and Caleb Billman

 

October 11, 2010

NSF Grant Continues
Support of Research into Pulsars

Featuring distances so vast and detailed calculations so precise and complex that they each in their way seem to approach the infinite, the astronomical research conducted by Dr. Peter Gonthier of the Hope College physics faculty provides a stellar learning opportunity for the students who work with him.

Gonthier, working in collaboration with Hope students, has been studying the rotating stars known as pulsars for nearly 20 years. His research is currently supported by three federal grants - two from NASA, the second of which he received this summer; and a third, awarded this fall, through the "Research in Undergraduate Institutions" program of the National Science Foundation (NSF-RUI).

He is engaged by the opportunity to address fundamental questions about how the universe works, but - like his colleagues throughout the division of the natural and applied sciences at Hope--he is particularly driven by providing a chance for students to learn how science works by involving them in the process. Students are regularly co-researchers with him, working on campus during the school year and summer as well as at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., for a number of weeks each summer; making presentations at professional conferences; and even earning co-author status on publications.

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October 11, 2010

NSF Grant Continues
Support of Research into Pulsars

Featuring distances so vast and detailed calculations so precise and complex that they each in their way seem to approach the infinite, the astronomical research conducted by Dr. Peter Gonthier of the Hope College physics faculty provides a stellar learning opportunity for the students who work with him.

Gonthier, working in collaboration with Hope students, has been studying the rotating stars known as pulsars for nearly 20 years. His research is currently supported by three federal grants - two from NASA, the second of which he received this summer; and a third, awarded this fall, through the "Research in Undergraduate Institutions" program of the National Science Foundation (NSF-RUI).

He is engaged by the opportunity to address fundamental questions about how the universe works, but - like his colleagues throughout the division of the natural and applied sciences at Hope--he is particularly driven by providing a chance for students to learn how science works by involving them in the process. Students are regularly co-researchers with him, working on campus during the school year and summer as well as at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., for a number of weeks each summer; making presentations at professional conferences; and even earning co-author status on publications.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

 



September 27, 2010


Major NSF Grant Funds
Expansion of “Supercomputer”

A major instrumentation grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a supercomputer housed at Hope College is going to help make a successful collaborative effort even better.

The award, $299,942 through the NSF's "Major Research Instrumentation" program, is funding the purchase of a "cluster" of 50 computers with 600 compute cores for use by faculty and student research teams at the eight colleges and universities, including Hope, that comprise the "Midwest Undergraduate Computational Chemistry Consortium."

The new equipment will expand the existing cluster of 60 computers with 120 compute cores installed at Hope during 2005-06 when the consortium consisted of four institutions. The project reflects the increased demand as the consortium has become larger and the cutting-edge research being conducted requires even greater capacity, according to Dr. Brent Krueger (pictured), who is an associate professor of chemistry and the grant's principal investigator.

"Because this consortium has been successful at promoting undergraduate research, we've grown," Krueger said.

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September 7, 2010


Grant from NASA Supports
Study of Pulsars

A highly competitive grant from NASA is supporting a Hope College physicist's research into the presence and nature of the rotating stars known as pulsars.

Dr. Peter Gonthier, a professor of physics, is leading a three-scholar team from two continents in an effort to investigate the potential relationship between positrons - which are a form of electrically charged particle--and gamma ray pulsars. They are using the information to refine computer models, which Gonthier has been developing for NASA for several years, to better understand and locate the stars, which cannot be seen by the naked eye or even detected from earth.

The project is supported by a one-year, $45,161 NASA Fermi Guest Investigator grant that took effect in July.

The research follows what Gonthier described as the major break-through in data-gathering concerning the stars since the 2008 launch of the highly sensitive Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. Where the Fermi telescope's predecessor had discovered seven to eight gamma pulsars during its entire nine-year life, Fermi found about 60 in its first year.

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July 28, 2010


Chemist Jeff Johnson Receives
National ACS Research Grant

Dr. Jeff Johnson, an assistant professor of chemistry and Towsley Research Scholar at Hope College, has received an Undergraduate New Investigator Grant from the American Chemical Society's Petroleum Research Fund (ACS-PRF).

He has been awarded $50,000 for the next two years for his project "Toward Greater Understanding and Expanded Utility of the Palladium-Catalyzed Activation of Carbon-Carbon Single Bonds." The ACS makes approximately 45 of the awards nationwide each year.

The Undergraduate New Investigator grants provide funds for scientists and engineers who are in the beginning years of their independent careers in academia, and are intended as seed money for generating preliminary results that can be used in applying for further funding from other agencies. Recipients must be in departments without doctoral programs and must involve undergraduate students in the work being supported.

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February 4, 2010

Major NSF Equipment Grant
Assists Multiple Departments

A major grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) is enabling Hope College to purchase equipment that will support research in multiple departments in the natural and physical sciences.

The college has received $215,180 through the NSF's Major Research Instrumentation program for a scanning electron microscope and a chemical autoanalyzer. Faculty in biology, chemistry and physics worked together in seeking the grant with research projects already lined up for the new equipment, with additional uses for teaching and research by other programs envisioned. The instruments should arrive by the end of the spring semester.

"This really has been an interdisciplinary effort," said Dr. Graham Peaslee, who is one of three faculty coordinating the project and is a professor and chairperson of chemistry and a professor of geology/environmental science. "These instruments will help generations of students here."

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February 3, 2010

Research Project to Study Jazz in Japan

A Hope College professor and his student research team have received support to study how the distinctly American art form of jazz has thrived in Japan for decades.

Dr. Robert Hodson, associate professor of music, has received a $26,000 ASIANetwork Freeman Student-Faculty Fellowship for his project "Jazz in Japan: Music, Community, Culture." The grant, which funds collaborative student-faculty research in Asia, will provide support as he and four students travel to Japan for three weeks in July to study the Tokyo jazz scene by attending performances and interviewing performers, club owners, students and listeners.

Japan's jazz tradition goes back to the 1920s, according to Hodson. He noted that following its beginnings in New Orleans and spread to the rest of the U.S., jazz was introduced to Japan by American and Filipino jazz bands and quickly developed a fan base, even surviving the war years.

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October 12, 2009

Hope-Led Consortium Receives NSF Grant

With a namesake nod to a Renaissance painting by a famous artist-scientist, a major new equipment grant to Hope College will enable a new generation of student researchers to engage in cutting-edge investigations themselves.

Hope is the lead institution of a nine-school consortium that is sharing $1.2 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) - of which Hope gets $203,894--to build a new "Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array" (LISA), a neutron detector that will be used in the study of exotic nuclei. The instrument will be housed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University, a facility that already hosts another neutron detector developed through a consortium that also includes Hope and was supported by a previous NSF grant.

That earlier detector is known as "MoNA," for Modular Neutron Array. Thus the pair of instruments together will become, pun intended, MoNA-LISA, sharing in combination the name of Leonardo DaVinci's best-known painting.

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September 29, 2009

Major Grant Funds Arts and
Humanities Research Program

A major grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is funding a new program at Hope College designed to deepen students' scholarship in the arts and humanities through collaborative, interdisciplinary research projects and the use of digital technologies.

The foundation has awarded Hope $200,000 to create the "Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholars Program in the Arts and Humanities." The program, which will begin in the fall of 2010, will involve select students in a series of new courses beginning their sophomore year and enable them across the rest of their time at Hope to develop research projects in areas of scholarly interest with faculty mentors, with a particular emphasis on teaching them how to use new and emerging digital technologies in pursuing and sharing their work.

"The Mellon program will build upon the college's long tradition of student-faculty collaborative scholarship by offering a unique opportunity to students who are passionate about the arts and humanities and want to deepen their learning," said Dr. James Boelkins, provost at Hope. "Through coursework and collaborative research, they will become better learners and better writers, and will be better prepared for graduate school or the workplace."

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September 1, 2009

Hope Receives NSF Grant
for New Spectrometer

A major grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will help enable Hope College to continue to provide its students access to highly sophisticated and modern equipment while expanding its educational reach through cyberspace.

The NSF has awarded Hope $416,767 to purchase a new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, which is a powerful tool for studying the structures and dynamics of chemical compounds. The new instrument, which the college plans to install during the spring semester, succeeds a predecessor that was itself sophisticated when it replaced another of its kind a dozen years ago - such is the difference that advances in technology make, according to the grant proposal's lead author.

"There have been significant changes in technology since we purchased our current NMR 12 years ago," said Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, who is an assistant professor of chemistry and is co-directing the grant project with Dr. Moses Lee, dean for the natural sciences and professor of chemistry. "The primary benefit of this instrument to our program is that it has greater sensitivity, which will enable it to test smaller samples and to work more quickly. It will also have an auto-sampler, allowing us to set up 30 or more experiments to run automatically overnight."

Multiple research groups at Hope use the college's NMR spectrometer. It plays a role in projects ranging from monitoring of phosphates in the bed of LakeMacatawa, to analyzing molecular structures that aid the design and synthesis of polymers for electronic and biomedical applications, photochromes and novel medicinal agents. It will also enable the determination of the structure and conformation of biomolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids. The current instrument's benefits across the past 12 years have included providing data for 56 peer-reviewed publications that have included 197 undergraduate co-authors.

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August 26, 2009

NSF Funds Development of
Software for Genetic Research

Hope College has received a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a project that is linking three Hope departments and three institutions in developing computer models for genetic research.

The support will enable faculty and students in the departments of biology, computer science and mathematics to expand an ongoing research effort at Hope to develop software to model microbial metabolism based on information encoded in microbial genomes. The resulting package will ultimately become part of the RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystems Technology) genome analysis service available to researchers internationally through Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois.

The goal of the Hope project is to provide integrated, automated tools that can assist researchers internationally to analyze the genomes, model the way the metabolism works and provide tools for analyzing regulatory data.

"The pace of genetic sequencing is increasingly exponentially, and there's more data than can be analyzed manually," said Dr. Matt DeJongh, who is an associate professor of computer science and leading the project with Dr. Aaron Best of the biology faculty and Dr. Nathan Tintle of the mathematics faculty. "By putting all three pieces together, we're hoping to be able to make predictions about metabolism and regulation in bacteria, and to do so more efficiently than would be possible using disparate tools in different locations with different interfaces."

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July 8, 2009

Grant Supports Research
on Cell Functioning

A major multi-year grant from the National Science Foundation is supporting a Hope College professor's on-going research into how cells produce natural anti-oxidants.

Dr. Leah Chase, associate professor of biology and chemistry at Hope, has received a three-year, $466,724 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for her project focused on understanding strategies used by cells to combat oxidative damage. The support began in June and will continue through May 31, 2012.

Chase's research lab studies how cells control the production of the intracellular anti-oxidant, glutathione. Specifically, Chase and her students examine the basic mechanisms by which oxidants regulate the function of membrane transport proteins which internalize the precursors for the synthesis of the gluathione. She notes that a better understanding of such cellular processes is of fundamental importance because oxidative stress can lead to significant cellular damage and ultimately cell death if left unchecked.

Chase's research team will include Hope undergraduates during both the school year and summer, as well as high school students during the summer through "Project REACH" (Research Experience Across Cultures at Hope).

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May 1, 2009

Van Andel Foundation Gift
Supports Hope Soccer Project

Hope College officials today announced the name of the school's new $5.3 million Van Andel Soccer Stadium at a groundbreaking ceremony honoring the project's lead donors, David and Carol Van Andel. The Van Andel family revealed a lead gift of $3 million from the David & Carol Van Andel Foundation to help build a world-class athletic facility serving the HopeCollege soccer program and Holland-area sports and recreation community.

"As Hope College alumni and the proud parents of two Flying Dutchmen, Carol and I are honored to be involved in a project that will enhance the school's athletic program and provide our community with one of the finest soccer stadiums in the country," said David Van Andel. "In addition to enjoying a beautiful new facility, we are confident the community will also realize a significant economic impact with the ability to attract major sporting events to the area."

Designed to complement Hope's recently expanded athletic complex, the new stadium will be built on the site of the college's existing soccer fields on Fairbanks Avenue near 11th Street in Holland. The state-of-the-art facility will include stadium-style and bleacher seating for 1,400 fans, a concession stand, public restrooms, two locker rooms, a training room, a meeting room for visiting teams along with a ticket booth and press box. It will also feature terrace areas for picnics and tailgating as well as lighting for night games and artificial turf. Construction is expected to be completed this October.

"Our gift is a tribute to the tireless dedication of the Hope College players, coaches and staff, a recognition of the impressive records set by both the men's and women's soccer teams, and an opportunity to engage the community and energize its youth," said Carol Van Andel.

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April 19, 2009


Hope Participates in
International NASA Project

Physics researchers at Hope College are participating in a NASA-funded collaborative project that is linking multiple teams in an international effort that could result in a giant leap in mankind's understanding a type of star.

Dr. Peter Gonthier, who is a professor of physics, and his student researchers are part of a NASA-based project that has been seeking to better understand how pulsars, which are highly compact collapsed stars, produce high-energy gamma rays. The team's project, "Particle Acceleration and High Energy Radiation from Pulsar Magnetospheres," has recently received a three-year, $459,043 grant--$76,866 of which will support work at Hope - from the NASA Astrophysics Theory Program.

"This grant is highly significant because it is mainstream and it has to compete with the big guns to get funded by NASA," said Dr. Moses Lee, who is dean for the natural and applied sciences and a professor of chemistry at Hope. "I am extremely proud of Pete and his collaborators."

Read the announcement


April 18, 2009

Named Fund Honors
Herb Dershem for Service

Dr. Herbert Dershem, who played a leadership role in developing the department of computer science at Hope College, is being recognized through a lasting tribute with a fitting focus: a student research fund in his name.

Alumni and faculty colleagues of the department announced the creation of the "Herb Dershem Summer Research Fund" on Saturday, April 18, during an appropriate milestone, a reception scheduled in celebration of the department's 35-year anniversary. Once fully endowed, the fund will provide support for a student to conduct research full-time with the department for eight to 10 weeks during the summers, joining students who are conducting research in the program through other external and internal sources of support.

Dershem is a professor of computer science and director of institutional research at Hope. He has taught at the college since 1969, five years before the department of computer science was established in 1974, and served as the department's chair from 1975 through 2003. In addition to teaching and helping develop the program's curriculum, he played a significant role in shaping the department's practice of involving students in original, collaborative research projects with members of the faculty.

"During his 40 years at Hope, Herb has had a significant impact on hundreds of people," said Dr. Ryan McFall, an associate professor of computer science who has taught at Hope since 2000 - and who as a 1993 Hope graduate is also one of Dershem's former students. "My life certainly would not be the same without his teaching and mentoring."

Read the announcement


April 1, 2009

Four Hope Students Receive
Goldwater Recognition

Four Hope College science students - as many as colleges and universities were invited to nominate - have received national recognition from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation.

Juniors Mark Lunderberg of Grandville and Blair Williams of Fenton have each received Goldwater Scholarships for the 2009-10 academic year, out of only 278 awarded nationwide. Juniors Joel Blok of Schoolcraft and Paul Frybarger of Muskegon have each received honorable mention, out of only 175 students to be accorded the recognition.

"It is a tremendous accomplishment for our students to have been recognized by the Goldwater Foundation in this way," said Dr. Moses Lee, who is dean for the natural and applied sciences and professor of chemistry at Hope. "It also demonstrates the high quality of our programs in the natural and applied sciences, particularly our focus on learning by doing through undergraduate research."

The scholarships were awarded by the Board of Trustees of the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation to undergraduate sophomores and juniors. The Goldwater Scholars were selected on the basis of academic merit from a field of 1,097 mathematics, science and engineering students who were nominated by the faculties of colleges and universities nationwide.

Read the press release


 

November 18, 2008

Foundation Awards Grant
for Student Research

For the second consecutive year, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation is presenting Hope College with support for a student to conduct research during the summer in chemistry.

The foundation annually provides the awards, the "Jean Dreyfus Boissevain Undergraduate Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry," to selected colleges and universities as a stipend for an exceptional undergraduate to carry out chemistry research with a faculty mentor. They are presented in recognition of the positive environment that the recipient institutions provide to encourage undergraduates to develop interest in the chemical sciences through research.

The award will include a $4,500 salary to support the student in conducting research for 10 weeks during the forthcoming summer and an additional $1,000 for related supplies.

Students at Hope engage in collaborative research projects with the college's faculty both part-time during the school year and full-time for several weeks during the summer.

Read the Press Release


 

October 1, 2008

Research Will Trace
Presence of Nuclear Materials

A research project at Hope College is seeking to provide new tools in the ongoing effort to assure national security, focusing on a specific area of nuclear forensics: how to determine whether or not nuclear materials have ever been present in a particular location.

The project, led by Dr. Graham Peaslee of the Hope College faculty, has recently received a three-year, $149,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security. The award is through department's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, which is seeking to enhance the nation's ability to detect and report attempts to import or transport a nuclear device, Special Nuclear Material or radiological materials intended for illicit use. Special Nuclear Materials are those elements that fission readily and can be made into a nuclear device.

The project is a fundamental research initiative that will focus on developing a method to determine whether or not common minerals have been exposed to neutron irradiation. The approach, Peaslee noted, is based on the idea that the radiation will have affected the structure of the minerals in a way that can be measured even though they will not be radioactive.

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September 8, 2008

Matt DeJongh Receives
Fulbright and NSF Awards

Dr. Matt DeJongh, who is an associate professor of computer science and a Towsley Research Scholar at Hope College, has received support for his ongoing work in bioinformatics through both the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program and the National Science Foundation.

He has received a Fulbright-Aquitaine Regional Council Award to spend the spring of 2009 conducting groundbreaking functional genomic research in France. In addition, his ongoing research at Hope in bioinformatics has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Through the Fulbright award, DeJongh will be working from mid January through mid June at one of France's largest academic computer science laboratories, LaBRI (Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique), which is based at the Université de Bordeaux. He will be collaborating with researchers at the laboratory in the field of bioinformatics, which blends biology and computer science in managing and analyzing genetic data compiled through projects such as the Human Genome Project.

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April 22, 2008

Major Grant Emphasizes
External Research Ties

A major grant to Hope College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) will enable the college to strengthen existing relationships and build new ones as the college continues to emphasize its acclaimed model of teaching through faculty-student collaborative research in the sciences.

HHMI has awarded Hope a $1.4 million, four-year grant, part of $60 million in grants to 48 institutions in 21 states and Puerto Rico. The recipients include three colleges from Michigan, all from the west side of the state: Hope, Calvin and Kalamazoo.

The new grant to Hope will fund multiple initiatives, many building on the success of efforts that have been supported by a $1.5 million, four-year grant that the college received from HHMI in 2004. Emphases will include enhancing research efforts in the biomedical sciences at Hope, with particular attention to collaborations with other institutions; increased emphasis on training K-12 science and mathematics teachers; increasing diversity in science, both at Hope and beyond; and initiating and participating in efforts to promote and develop scholarly lessons concerning teaching and learning at the college as well as within the broader higher education community.

Read the Press Release


April 24, 2008

Beckman Foundation Award
Funds Student Research

Hope College has received a fifth consecutive award for student research from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation of Irvine, Calif., the only college or university in the nation to have received continuous support through the program since it started. Hope is one of only 15 institutions nationwide to receive a "Beckman Scholar Award" for 2008. Hope also received awards in 1998, the year that the program began, and 2000, 2002 and 2005.

The Beckman Scholars Program is an invited program for accredited universities and four-year colleges in the United States. It provides scholarship support to select students at the recipient institutions in chemistry, biochemistry, and the biological and medical sciences with an emphasis on sustained, in-depth laboratory research experiences with faculty mentors.

The $77,200 award to Hope will support a total of four students across the next three years as they conduct research in biology, biochemistry/molecular biology or chemistry. The award will support the students as they conduct research with faculty members full-time during two summers and part-time during the intervening school year.

Read the Press Release


December 12, 2007

Hope Chosen for National
HHMI Science Initiative

Hope College is one of only a dozen colleges and universities nationwide and the only institution in Michigan selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to implement a new genomics course that will involve incoming freshmen in cutting-edge research during their first semester in college.

The program, the Phage Genomics Research Initiative, has been developed by HHMI's Science Education Alliance, which is a new initiative intended to help shape science education nationwide. HHMI is committing a total of $4 million overall over the first four years of the program, including the support given to all of the individual colleges and universities.

The research-based, year-long laboratory course has been designed to provide beginning college students with a true research experience that will teach them how to approach scientific problems creatively and hopefully solidify their interest in a career in science.

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November 19, 2007

Chemist Participates
in NSF-Funded Project

Dr. Joanne Stewart of the Hope College faculty is one of seven chemists from colleges and universities across the nation participating in a project recently funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop an online resource to help professors of inorganic chemistry work together to improve their teaching.

The project is titled "IONiC," for "Intellectual Online Network of Inorganic Chemists." It has received a $150,000 award for development during 2008 and 2009 through the NSF's "Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Initiative."

IONiC will use a Web site and other Internet technologies to develop a virtual community that will serve as a way for colleagues from a variety of institutions to work together conveniently regardless of distance to share and develop materials related to teaching in the discipline and to help each other improve through online discussions and workshops. Following the network's development and initial testing, it will become part of the National Science Digital Library, an online library for education and research in science that is available to scientists around the world.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


September 25, 2007

Project Will Benefit CASA and
Upward Bound Students

A new effort at Hope College will focus on inspiring a brighter future for the local elementary-age and high school students participating in the Children's After School Achievement (CASA) and Upward Bound program at Hope.

The Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) has awarded a "Brighter Futures" grant to the college for activities to help the two programs place additional emphasis on overcoming obstacles to academic success and preparing the students to think about their futures. The $6,000 grant has been awarded to Dr. Deborah Sturtevant of the college's sociology and social work faculty through MCC's "Investing in College Futures Learn and Serve" program, and will provide support matched by Hope and the business community as students in the department develop the additional activities on CASA's and Upward Bound's behalf.

CASA, a community organization housed at Hope, focuses on academic and cultural enrichment for at-risk second-through fifth-grade students. The program, which runs year-round, is intended to improve the students' academic performance by providing the tools they need to succeed in school.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


September 18, 2007

Grant to Support Students
from Community Colleges

A major new grant to Hope College from the National Science Foundation (NSF) will provide scholarship aid to community-college students who are interested in continuing their education in the sciences at Hope.

The scholarships will support students who transfer to Hope to major in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, the geological and environmental sciences, mathematics or physics after completing work at a community college. The $564,360 grant has been awarded through the NSF's "Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics" (S-STEM) program. It is one of approximately 90 new S-STEM awards made nationwide this year.

"Hope has a proven record of success in preparing students for successful careers in the sciences, but historically most of our students have gone through our entire four-year program. We believe we also have a lot to offer to students who have completed a two-year degree and are seeking the additional career options made available through a four-year degree," said Dr. Herb Dershem, who is the Hope initiative's coordinator and also a professor of computer science. "We hope that by providing additional scholarship assistance and enhancing our outreach to community colleges in the region that we can help make attending Hope a reality for them."

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


September 4, 2007

Chemist Jeff Johnson
Receives Dreyfus Award

Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, assistant professor of chemistry at Hope College, has received a Faculty Start-Up Award from the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Inc.

The foundation presents the awards to support the scholarly activity of new faculty at primarily undergraduate institutions, generally to faculty who will be beginning their first tenure-track appointments. The foundation typically awards only a dozen or fewer each year, and Johnson is the only recipient at a Michigan college or university from among the eight scholars who received the awards this year.

It is second time in four years that a member of the Hope faculty has received one of the awards. Dr. Jason Gillmore, also an assistant professor of chemistry, also received one when he joined the faculty in 2004.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


July 14, 2007

Hope Participates in
International Science Program

Hope College is one of nine colleges and universities from Canada, Mexico and the United States participating in the North American Mobility Project, a consortium focused on the study of ethics and public policy issues in the sciences in North America.

Through the consortium, students from any of the nine participating institutions will have an opportunity to spend a semester at an institution in one of the other two nations represented. The program includes three institutions each in Canada, Mexico and the U.S.

The program has been funded through a three-year, $203,021 grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) that will continue through August of 2010. In addition to Hope, the participating U.S. institutions are HowardUniversity in Washington, D.C., which is the U.S. lead for the project, and the University of Texas at El Paso. The participating Canadian institutions are ConcordiaUniversity in Montreal, Quebec; Université de Montréal; and St. PaulUniversity in Ottawa, Ontario. The participating institutions in Mexico are the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla; and Universidad Anahuac.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


June 13, 2007

Hope Receives One of Only
11 Phi Beta Kappa Grants

Hope College is one of only 11 colleges and universities nationwide chosen to participate in "Deliberation about Things That Matter," an initiative sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa to encourage the teaching and learning of deliberative skills through the discussion of major issues of meaning or value.

Through the support, Hope is developing a program with an academic focus for incoming freshmen in conjunction with New Student Orientation that will also link with campus-wide events scheduled for later in the school year.

"We are honored that Phi Beta Kappa selected Hope for participation and recognized our longstanding commitment to a liberal education that engages students in the deliberative thinking about issues that impact our world," said Dr. James Boelkins, provost at Hope. "The opportunity to engage our first-year students in discussions of important cultural issues will contribute to our efforts to grow world citizens in the soil of Hope."

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Grants Support CASA Summer Program

June 5, 2007

Local elementary-age children will be learning about the natural world in their own neighborhood this summer through a grant to the Children's After School Achievement (CASA) program at Hope College from the Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area.

And then they'll go into the new school year well-equipped thanks to further support from the Holland Junior Welfare League.

The Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area has awarded CASA $6,600 to help underwrite "CASA Goes Wild: Amazing Lessons in Nature," which will be featured throughout CASA's summer program, running Monday, June 18, through Thursday, July 26. The theme will provide the framework for a variety of activities for the approximately 110 second- through fifth-grade students the program anticipates hosting.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Professor Vicki Ten Haken
Receives Fulbright Award

May 2, 2007

Vicki Ten Haken, associate professor of management at Hope College, will spend the fall and winter teaching and conducting research in Krakow, Poland, through an award from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program.

Ten Haken is the fourth member of the Hope faculty to receive one of the awards in the past four years, and it is the second year in a row that a member of the economics, management and accounting faculty has received one. Dr. Victor Claar, associate professor of economics, has spent the 2006-07 school year teaching at the American University of Armenia in Yerevan, Armenia, through a Fulbright award. In 2004, Dr. William Cohen, professor emeritus of history, and Dr. David Klooster, professor of English, received Fulbright awards to teach in Japan and Austria respectively.

Ten Haken will be teaching management classes at the Krakow University of Economics in the university's MBA and international business studies programs. She will participate in an orientation program in Warsaw during the latter half of September and then be in Krakow from October through the end of the university's first semester in February.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Grant Supports NSBE Chapter

January 22, 2007

The Hope College chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has received a grant from the DaimlerChrysler Corporation Fund in support of professional development opportunities for its student members.

The $2,500 grant will enable students to attend the regional and national conferences of the NSBE.

The NSBE is the premier organization serving African Americans in engineering and technology. With 15,000 members and more than 300 chapters, NSBE supports and promotes the aspirations of university and pre-college students and technical professionals. The society's mission is to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.

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Professor Veldman and senior Becky Lathrop show
Congressman Peter Hoekstra materials used in the testing.

October 11, 2006

Research Seeks to Reduce
Aircraft Blast Damage

Even as security measures internationally endeavor to prevent terrorists from smuggling explosives onto aircraft, Dr. Roger Veldman of the Hope College engineering faculty is conducting research he hopes will make a difference if the unthinkable does happen.

Veldman, an associate professor of engineering, is engaged in a multi-year, ongoing research effort to help aircraft better withstand internal explosions. His work has recently received funding from the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security, the third in a series of federal grants in support of his work in the wake of the 9-11 attacks in 2001.

"The idea is, how can you make aircraft structures more robust if something does make it through the security system," he said.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Player's Sacrifice for Team
Inspires Scholarship

August 15, 2006

A Hope College basketball player's selfless act is having an effect far beyond her team's recent national championship season.

It's led to creation of a scholarship that will help other students in perpetuity.

When the Hope women's basketball team made it to the playoffs this past spring, NCAA regulations required that only 15 players could suit up for the competition. Hope's MIAA championship squad had 16 members. Rather than make it necessary for Coach Brian Morehouse to choose or perhaps for one of her teammates to sit out the remaining games, junior guard Becky Bosserd of Sparta stepped forward and volunteered to spend the rest of the season in her street clothes.

The gracious gesture earned the admiration of her coach, her team mates and also Hope's loyal fans. One of those fans, community member Rob Zaagman, has decided to celebrate it by establishing an endowed scholarship at the college in her name. The "Rebecca Bosserd Scholarship Fund," available starting with the new school year, is intended for any student with financial need who, in keeping with Bosserd's example, has shown commitment to servant-leadership or volunteerism.

Learn more


CrossRoads Project Receives
Renewal Grant Posted

June 20, 2006

The CrossRoads Project at Hope College has received a three-year renewal grant through Lilly Endowment Inc.'s "Program for the Theological Exploration of Vocation" (PTEV).

The $500,000 grant will support the program from the fall of 2009 through the spring of 2012. The CrossRoads Project was established through a $2 million PTEV grant that Hope received from the Endowment in 2002 that will continue to provide funding until the new grant takes effect.

Read the press release


Grants Support CASA Summer Program

June 6, 2006

The Old West will take on new life through the Children's After School Achievement (CASA) program at Hope College this summer with the help of grants from two local organizations.

The Youth Advisory Committee of the Community Foundation of the Holland/Zeeland Area has awarded CASA $9,960 to help underwrite "CASA Strikes Gold on the Journey West," which will be featured throughout CASA's summer program, running Monday, June 19, through Thursday, July 27. The western theme will provide the framework for a variety of activities for the approximately 100 second- through fifth-grade students the program anticipates hosting.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, through a grant to Holland Hospital and Hope College, has provided $4,735 in support of CASA's "ABC Workout (Active Bodies at CASA)" program, which as part of the summer program will offer structured physical activity and presentations designed to help the children value and practice physical fitness.

Read the press release


Grant Supports Van Raalte
Institute Program

May 16, 2006

A grant from the Netherland-America Foundation of New York City to the A.C. Van Raalte Institute at Hope College is supporting the institute's on-going commitment to sponsoring scholars conducting research on area history. The $10,000 grant from the NAF is underwriting the "NAF Visiting Research Fellowship Program" at the institute for the next three years, starting this fall. Representatives of the NAF presented a check for the first year during a visit to the institute on Wednesday, May 10, during the city's Tulip Time Festival.

"I'm very pleased with receiving this grant because it enables us to enhance our visiting research fellows program, doubling the size of the research fellowship," said Dr. Jacob E. Nyenhuis, who is director of the Van Raalte Institute. "By labeling this person the 'NAF Visiting Research Fellow' we add prestige to the fellowship and help to promote the NAF as well."

Read the press release


Science Center Named in
Honor of Hope Alumnus

May 5, 2006


Paul and Carol Schaap

A Hope College graduate who appreciated his own undergraduate experience has given a $7 million leadership gift in support of the college's science center project as a way of saying thank you and helping new generations of students. In recognition of the gift, given by Dr. A. Paul Schaap and his wife Carol of Grosse Pointe Park, the college is naming the building the "A. Paul Schaap Science Center." Both the gift and the naming were announced on Friday, May 5, in conjunction with the spring meeting of the college's Board of Trustees.

"This is a generous and transforming gift for this exceptional facility and for enhancing Hope's national reputation in collaborative undergraduate research," said Hope College President Dr. James Bultman. "With this gift, Paul and Carol are giving the largest gift to the science center project, one of the largest gifts Hope has ever received, and in the process are providing the last remaining piece of the very successful 'Legacies: A Vision of Hope'capital campaign."

Read the announcement

Learn more about the A. Paul Schaap Science Center


Hope Again Leads with
Six NSF-REU Grants

April 24, 2006

For a third consecutive year Hope College holds six grants for summer student research from the National Science Foundation's "Research Experiences for Undergraduates" (NSF-REU) program, continuing to hold more than any other liberal arts college in the country.

Among all institutions nationwide, including major research universities, fewer than 20 hold more of the grants.
Hope holds the grants in biology, chemistry, computer science, the geological and environmental sciences, mathematics, and physics and engineering. It is the 15th consecutive year that at least four Hope departments have had NSF-REU support.

Read the press release


Several Hope Projects
Receive Consortium Support

March 6, 2006

Several Hope College projects have received grants from the Michigan Space Grant Consortium.

A total of 10 projects from Hope received funding from the consortium through its 2006-07 grant period. The awards to Hope projects are in three categories: seven are fellowships for students conducting collaborative research with members of the college's faculty, two are "seed grants" for faculty research and one is through an initiative for pre-college education. They total $32,500, including $2,500 for each of the student fellowships, and $5,000 each for the other three projects. The consortium awarded grants in the three categories to a total of 34 projects statewide, chosen from among 92 applications.

Read the press release


Department News

November 16, 2010

College Advancement Video Series Honored

A video series produced at Hope College has won multiple honors in the "Pride of CASE V Awards Program" sponsored by the Great Lakes District V of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

The "Hope College: An Education for Life" series that the college developed for use during the WGVU telecasts of the two January 2010 Hope-Calvin men's basketball games is receiving a silver award and two bronze awards. The awards will be presented on Tuesday, Dec. 14, during the closing luncheon of the 2010 CASE V District Conference in Chicago, Ill.

The series is receiving the Silver Award for "Best Video, Student Recruitment"; the Bronze Award for "Best Video Feature"; and the Bronze Award for "Best Video, Fundraising, Alumni Relations or Commercial Spots."

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


November 17, 2009

College Advancement
e-Newsletter Honored

An internal fund-raising electronic newsletter produced at Hope College has won second-place honors in the "Pride of CASE V Awards Program" sponsored by the Great Lakes District V of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

The award will be presented on Tuesday, Dec. 15, during the closing luncheon of the 2009 CASE V District Conference in Chicago, Ill.

The faculty and staff e-newsletter "In Progress" has won a Silver Award in the "Best Tabloid/Newsletter for Internal Audience" category. Published twice a year, the newsletter provides updates regarding progress toward major fundraising initiatives at the college. The e-newsletter is edited by college advancement staff members Jason Cash and Kate Frillmann.

Read the announcement

 


October 31, 2008

College Advancement
Communication Programs Honored

Hope College has won multiple honors in the "Pride of CASE V Awards Program" sponsored by the Great Lakes District V of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The awards will be presented on Tuesday, Dec. 16, during the 2008 CASE V District Conference in Chicago, Ill.

Publications used as case statements in fund-raising efforts at the college were honored in two categories, one at the Gold level and the other at the Bronze level. Development of the pieces was shepherded by staff members Jason Cash '07, Kate Frillmann of the college's Advancement Division.

The video The Mission of Hope College: Anchors of Hope won the Bronze Award in the "Best Video/DVD/CD-ROM, Fundraising, Alumni Relations or Commercial Spots" category. Developed by staff members Jason Cash '07 and Scott Travis '06, the program debuted as the college's halftime segment during the televised spring 2008 Hope-Calvin basketball games and has since been used for a variety of college projects.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Staff News


Beth Szczerowski Joins
Alumni and Parent Relations Staff

January 5, 2010

Beth Szczerowski has joined the Hope College staff as assistant director of alumni and parent relations.

She started in the position on Monday, Jan. 4. She is responsible for a number of the events, activities and services at the college for alumni and parents and families of students, and works with the program's director on a variety of other aspects of the program.

As assistant director, Szczerowski will assist with the college's regional events and annual on-campus events for alumni, parents and students hosted by the office. She holds additional responsibility for involving alumni and parent volunteers in the college's programs, and for communicating with alumni, parents and friends of the college. She will also assist the program's director, Scott Travis, with strategic planning and program development, and in promoting financial support of the college to alumni, parents, friends and families of Hope.

Read the press release


 


November 30, 2007


Tom and Carole Renner
Honored for Service

After spending more than four decades helping to put the spotlight on Hope College students, faculty, teams, coaches and athletes, Tom Renner is in turn receiving some enduring recognition from the college.

Renner and his wife Carole are being honored for their significant roles in the life of the college by having the media section of the Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse named in their honor. A bronze plaque commemorating the recognition will be unveiled during pre-game activities for the Hope men's basketball game that begins at 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 7, as part of the Holland Sentinel Community Tournament.

"It is time to recognize Tom and Carole for their distinguished service to Hope College for the past 40 years," said President Dr. James E. Bultman. "Tom has received accolades from so many different organizations, and it is fitting now for this place that receives most of his attention to honor him and his wife Carole. Their work at Hope, especially in intercollegiate sport, has been a team effort. No one could give what Tom has given without the involvement and support of an understanding spouse."

READ THE PRESS RELEASE


Scott Travis Joins
Alumni & Parent Relations Staff

June 13, 2006

Scott Travis has joined the Hope College staff as assistant director of alumni and parent relations.

He started in the position on Tuesday, Sept. 5. He is responsible for a number of the events, activities and services at the college for alumni, and parents and families of students, and works with the program's director on a variety of other aspects of the program.

As assistant director, Travis will assist with the college's regional events and annual on-campus events for alumni, parents and students hosted by the office. He holds additional responsibility for involving alumni and parent volunteers in the college's programs, and for communicating with alumni, parents and friends of the college. He will also assist the program's director, Mary Remenschneider, with strategic planning and program development, and in promoting financial support of the college to alumni, parents, friends and families of Hope.

Read the press release


Advancement Staff Addition
and Changes Announced

June 13, 2006

Hope College has announced an addition to and several promotions and changes within its advancement staff.

Annie Valkema joined the staff on Monday, June 12, as a regional advancement director. She is responsible for the college's fund-raising efforts in Southern California as well as in portions of West Michigan.

She was most recently a member of the advancement staff at Houghton College in New York, where she was director of the annual fund from 2000 to 2004 and a major gifts officer from 2004 until coming to Hope. Prior to joining the Houghton staff, Valkema had been employed at the University of Michigan. She was senior coordinator of Alumni Clubs from 1997 to 2000; a student services representative in the School of Public Health from 1992 to 1997; and a publication assistant with News and Information Services from 1989 to 1991.

Read the press release


Advancement Staff Additions Announced

March 13, 2006

Hope College has made two appointments in recent months to the college's advancement team. Brett Holleman and John Ruiter, who are both Hope alumni, have both joined the staff as regional advancement directors. Holleman started at the college in late February, and Ruiter in November.

Holleman was most recently a development officer with the Holland Hospital Foundation. He had earlier served in development roles with Good Samaritan Ministries in Holland and Holland Christian Schools. Prior to his work in development he had worked in youth ministry with Young Life and Beechwood Church in the Holland area.

Read the press release


Tom Renner Named "Paul Harris Fellow"

January 24, 2006

Tom Renner of the Hope College public relations office attended the Thursday, Jan. 19, meeting of the Holland Rotary Club thinking that he'd been invited as a guest in celebration of his birthday. That was only partially true. He was actually there to receive a present: recognition as a Paul Harris Fellow.

Renner was selected for and presented the award by Rotary member Jerry Redeker, a long-time friend, "for service and humanitarian efforts in the Holland community and for Hope College." The citation, accompanied by a pin and medallion, further notes that the award is given "in appreciation of tangible and significant assistance given for the furtherance of better understanding and friendly relations among peoples of the world."

Read the press release

 


Hope Considered
a "Best Value"
by Kiplinger's Personal Finance

Hope College is included in the annual rankings of the best values among private institutions, according to the annual rankings by Kiplinger's Personal Finance.

The listing recognizes colleges and universities that deliver a high-quality education at an affordable cost. Hope is ranked 77th out of 100 in the rankings. There are only two other private Michigan institutions included in the rankings, Hillsdale College and Kalamazoo College.

The publication said it began with a pool of more than 600 private institutions. The rankings are based on academic quality and affordability.

Hope's Reputation Praised in College Guides

Hope College continues to fare well in the newest editions of multiple college guides. Recent guides that list Hope among the select number of institutions they single out for praise include the 2011 "Best Colleges" published by "U.S. News & World Report," the 2011 "Fiske Guide to Colleges" and the "America's Best Colleges 2010" published by "Forbes Magazine."

The annual rankings compiled by "U.S. News & World Report" have once again included Hope College among the 100 best liberal arts colleges in the nation.

The college is 88th out of 266 institutions that are considered national liberal arts colleges in the rankings. A year ago Hope was ranked 92nd.

In addition, Hope also continues to be included among the institutions that the publication recognizes for providing outstanding undergraduate research/creative project opportunities, and the college is also included in a new category that highlights the nation's best undergraduate teaching.

The "Fiske Guide to Colleges," now in its 27th edition, continues to include Hope as one of only about 310 colleges and universities that it highlights as "the best and most interesting institutions in the nation - the ones that students most want to know about." Hope has consistently been included in the publication through the years.

Hope is one of 610 institutions selected for inclusion in the "America's Best Colleges 2010" guide published by "Forbes Magazine," scheduled for release on Monday, Aug. 30. The guide includes 610 institutions, noting, "Whether they're in the top 10 or near the end of the list, all 610 schools in this ranking count among the best in the country: we review just 9% of the 6,600 accredited postsecondary institutions in the U.S., so appearing on our list at all is an indication that a school meets a high standard."

Hope Highlighted as a Favorite



Loren Pope’s newest edition Looking Beyond the Ivy League: Finding the College that's Right for You highlights Hope in a chapter titled "A Few Favorites."

"Hope, in Holland, Michigan, is another that merits a lot more attention than it gets, raising higher education's moral and intellectual levels. It is a place where parents can send children of a wide range of abilities, knowing that their talents will be increased, their visions broadened, their ethical acuities sharpened, and they will be prepared to prosper in a changed and changing world."

For the fifth consecutive year, Hope College has been named one of the "101 Best and Brightest Companies to Work For" in West Michigan.