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2010 WINTER HAPPENING

Schedule and Event Locations

Seminar Descriptions
All seminars are free, but we’d like you to register for
them so we can plan for enough seating for each session.
To make a reservation please contact:
Kathy Miller, (616) 395-7860, kmiller@hope.edu

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Registration

Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Mennonite in a Little Black Dress
Dr. Rhoda Janzen
DeWitt Center Main Theatre


The Valley Sim: New Forms
of Storytelling in a Digital Age

Dr. Christian Spielvogel
Haworth Inn and Conference Center - Gentex-Transmatic

Hopelessness and Heart Disease:
How Our Thoughts and Attitude Can Impact Our Health

Dr. Susan Dunn
Haworth Inn and Conference Center - Donnelly Dining Room

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Who Is It? Voice Quality and Speaker Identification
Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown
Haworth Inn and Conference Center - Ballroom 1 and 2

New Applications of Nuclear Science to Address Environmental and Forensic Questions
Dr. Graham Peaslee
Haworth Inn and Conference Center - Donnelly Dining Room

A lot to do for Hope Theatre’s
Much Ado About Nothing?

Dr. Daina Robins, Professor Michelle Bombe and Professor Richard Smith
DeWitt Center Main Theatre

12:30 p.m.
Luncheon with a musical presentation by the Luminescence, the women's a cappella group at Hope College.
($12 per person, advanced reservation required)
Haworth Inn and Conference Center - Ballroom 3


3 p.m.
Basketball Game (Adults $6, General Admission)
Hope men vs. Adrian
Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse


2010 SEMINARS

Mennonite in a Little Black Dress
Dr. Rhoda Janzen
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.


Not unreasonably, we expect our community of origin to affect our expressions of spirituality, and, for better or for worse, to explain why we seek or reject church participation as adults. However, our community of origin also predicates our response to crisis, setting the stage for how we will process challenges like divorce, change, risk, and forgiveness. Dr. Rhoda Janzen, author of Mennonite in a Little Black Dress, discusses her conservative upbringing in a presentation about memoir, media, and Mennonites. Trained as a poet and literary scholar, Dr. Janzen will describe her unexpected decision to tackle a humorous memoir. She will use an excerpt from the book to frame the contrasting responses among Mennonite and non-Mennonite readers. Q & A will follow.

    Mennonite in a Little Black Dress is snort-up-your-coffee funny, breezy yet profound, and poetic without trying.”
    —Kate Christensen, New York Times

    “Four stars!”—People Magazine”
Now in her tenth year at Hope College, Dr. Janzen teaches American literature, grammar, and creative writing. Her nonfiction has been excerpted and reviewed in the New York Times, and she has been featured in many sources including Time Magazine, USA Today, People, Elle, Marie Claire, The L.A. Times, and Entertainment Weekly. Her memoir Mennonite in a Little Black Dress (Henry Holt, 2009) was Editor’s Pick in the New York Times Book Review; it appears on Publishers Weekly Top 100 Books of the Year 2009.


The Valley Sim: New Forms
of Storytelling in a Digital Age
Dr. Christian Spielvogel
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

While the Internet has provided us with unprecedented and instantaneous access to vast sums of information, it also contains great untapped potential as a creative storytelling medium. This seminar examines one such example of digital storytelling — the Valley Sim — in greater depth. The Valley Sim is an online reenactment or simulation of the American Civil War based on the award-winning Valley of the Shadow digital archive. The Valley archive contains tens of thousands of original photographs, diaries, letters, maps, and newspaper articles that tell extraordinary stories about ordinary people from two wartime communities—Augusta County, Va., and Franklin County, Pa. The Valley Sim, by assembling the most dramatic, illustrative, and vital fragments from the Valley archive, generates a compelling, ground-level narrative of two wartime communities that students and members of the general public alike can reenact through collaborative online role-play. The seminar explores this project and its implications for 21st century forms of participatory learning and storytelling.

Dr. Spielvogel is an associate professor of communication at Hope, where he teaches courses in rhetoric and culture, social media, and conflict resolution, and conducts research on how public discourse and serious games can be used to critique enmity, violence, and war.


Hopelessness and Heart Disease:
How Our Thoughts and
Attitude Can Impact Our Health
Dr. Susan Dunn
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.



A connection between psychological health and heart disease has been suggested for a number of years. People who are hopeless expect a negative outcome, and feel helpless in changing themselves or the future. It is known that hopelessness puts a person at higher risk for developing heart disease. But how well does a hopeless person recover after a heart disease event? Is there a relationship between hopelessness and physical functioning? Do hopeless individuals adhere to a cardiac rehabilitation program? Is hopelessness a chronic tendency or can it be a temporary response to a heart illness? Dr. Dunn will share recent research findings and provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of hopelessness in individuals with heart disease.


Dr. Susan Dunn, associate professor of nursing and chair of the department, has taught at Hope since 1997. Her research has been supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research. She has published her research in several professional journals and presented at national and international meetings. She has won several teaching and research awards, including the New Investigator Award from the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation in 2008.


Who Is It?
Voice Quality and Speaker Identification
Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Have you ever listened to a person you don’t know—maybe over the phone or on the radio? Did you somehow get a mental picture of that person: male or female, older or younger, ethnicity? What information in the voice does the brain use to help us create the image of the speaker and how accurate are we in making these perceptual decisions? This seminar presents perceptual results for the contribution of voice quality as well as acoustic analysis outcomes that shed some light on the psychoacoustic variations that appear to help us to identify speakers.

Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown has been an assistant professor of psychology at Hope since 2005. Her research is in the areas of perception and psychoacoustics, and explores speech perception and the acoustic correlates that give rise to perceptual interpretations. She has worked extensively with cross-language speech perception and production with various languages, including American English, Japanese, German, Spanish, and African American English. In March 2009, she was selected as one of the
inaugural class of Franklin & Marshall Emerging Scholars Fellows for her work with acoustic resonance characteristics and speaker identification.


New Applications of Nuclear Science
to Address Environmental
and Forensic Questions
Dr. Graham Peaslee
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Particle accelerators have been the mainstay of experimental nuclear science for more than 50 years, and Hope College installed a brand new particle accelerator in 2004 with the unique purpose of expanding traditional nuclear science into other fields. Over the past five years we have expanded our research program from basic nuclear science into applied questions in environmental science, biochemistry, geochemistry, and even forensic science. This presentation will discuss this interdisciplinary growth and show examples where we use accelerated particles to study diverse topics such as contaminated lake sediments, proteins, auto glass, and sand dunes! Not only have we created new fundamental research results, but we have a wonderful educational tool for students from a wide variety of disciplines.


Dr. Graham Peaslee is professor of chemistry and geological and environmental sciences and chair of the chemistry department. He and Dr. Paul DeYoung in physics have collaborated to run the Hope College Nuclear Group for the past 16 years. Between them, they have mentored over 100 research students and produced more than 100 research publications associated with the Hope College Nuclear Group.


A lot to do for Hope Theatre’s
Much Ado About Nothing
Dr. Daina Robins, Professor Michelle Bombe
and Professor Richard Smith
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Join members of the department of theatre as they give you an inside view of the preparations for the upcoming production of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing to be performed on campus in March. The director and designers will share insights into their research and renderings of the designers, hear about the director’s dramaturgical approach, and see how the play goes from the page to the stage!


Dr. Daina Robins joined Hope's theatre department in 1991 and has served as chair since 1997. She teaches acting, directing, and theatre history and regularly directs for the department as well as the Hope Summer Repertory Theatre. Recent productions include Big Love, Little Women (the musical), and Rabbit Hole. Dr. Robins is a founding member of Double Edge Theatre of Massachusetts.


In addition to teaching, Michelle Bombe, professor of theatre, is the resident costume designer and director of theatre for the department. Professor Bombe is very active in the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival, serving as the vice-chair for Region 3. Her work has been seen at Hope Summer Repertory Theatre where she worked for 11 years and for 10 years at The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival.

Richard L. Smith, is an M.F.A. and McKnight Fellow from University of Minnesota. He currently serves as professor of theatre and resident scene designer at Hope College, where he teaches courses in stage design, theatre crafts, and film studies.

For additional information please contact: Lynne Powe ’86, (616) 395-7860, powe@hope.edu