Economics Degree Program

Economics students complete extensive, rigorous research projects that integrate data analysis with current topics, culminating in presentations to department faculty and the Hope community.

Economics students develop the quantitative and analytical toolset appropriate for a digital age that is awash in information but lacking clear direction. Our students learn how to handle data responsibly and develop practical solutions to real world problems.

Our majors are equipped with knowledge and experience necessary to tackle some of the toughest problems head on:

  • Reforming health care
  • Shaping a healthy financial system
  • Addressing poverty in the developing world
  • Envisioning environmentally sustainable business practices

They’re also in high demand. In recent surveys, economics graduates reported among the highest earnings, second only to engineering and physics in wages over a career.

Economics majors excel in graduate school admissions, scoring among the top on the LSAT, GMAT and GRE exams.

What Can You Do With An Economics Major?

Some resources and opportunities to consider:

  • American Economics Association
  • National Association of Business Economists
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • O*Net
  • Search economics consulting (different from management consulting, but also appropriate for economics majors), economics research assistant or junior economist. Economics majors are competitive in banking, finance, investments and other traditional business fields, as well. In short, an economics major opens doors to careers in government, for-profit business, nonprofit agencies and academia.
  • Consider graduate school in economics, public policy, finance, agricultural economics, etc. for additional job opportunities.
Planning Your Schedule
  • Intermediate Micro and Intermediate Macro can be taken in any order.
  • There’s no need to take any 300-level classes before registering for a 400-level course. In other words, pay attention to course prerequisities.
  • Consider spending a summer in a business- or nonprofit-oriented internship, another at a policy-oriented internship (think tank or government office) and another conducting collaborative research with an economics faculty member.
  • Interested in summer research on campus? Take Intermediate Micro and Econometrics as early as possible.
  • Graduate study in economics may require additional math classes; talk to a professor about your plans for suggestions.
Example Course Planning - Accelerated Schedule
  Fall Spring
Freshman  
  • ECON 211
    Principles of Macro
Sophomore
  • ECON 212
    Principles of Micro
  • Statistics
  • ECON Elective
  • Calculus I
Junior
  • ECON 312
    Intermediate Micro
  • Econ 306
    Econometrics
  • ECON 311
    Intermediate Macro
  • ECON 401
    History of Economic Thought
Senior
  • ECON Elective
  • ECON 480
    Senior Research
Example Course Planning - Fall Sophomore Year Start
  Fall Spring
Sophomore
  • ECON 211
    Principles of Macro
  • Statistics
  • ECON 212
    Principles of Micro
Junior
  • ECON 312
    Intermediate Micro
  • ECON Elective
  • ECON 311
    Intermediate Macro
  • ECON 401
    History of Economic Thought
Senior
  • ECON 306 Econometrics
  • ECON Elective
  • ECON 480
    Senior Research
Example Course Planning - Spring sophomore Year Start 
  Fall Spring
Sophomore  
  • ECON 211
    Principles of Macro
  • Statistics
Junior
  • ECON 212
    Principles of Micro
  • Calculus I
  • ECON 311
    Intermediate Macro
  • ECON Elective
Senior
  • ECON 312
    Intermediate Micro
  • ECON 306
    Econometrics
  • ECON Elective
  • ECON 480
    Senior Research ECOn
  • ECON 401
    History of Economic Thought