Chronology

1847

Settlements created in Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa by citizens from the Netherlands.

1848

Holland, Michigan, platted as a Village.

1850

A "Tract of Land" donated by the Rev. A.C. Van Raalte, later known as "The Five Acres" and designated as a site for the academy.

1851

The Pioneer School, the first educational institution in the new settlement, formally opened on The Five Acres in October.

1853

The General Synod of the Reformed Church in America assumed control of the school.

1858

Van Vleck Hall erected on The Five Acres.

1859

The Five Acres enlarged to 16 acres and designated the college campus.

1862

The first freshman class, 10 in number, matriculated, September.

1865

Philip Phelps, Jr. elected first president of Hope College; inaugurated, July 12, 1866.

1866

Charter of Incorporation as a College of Liberal Arts granted by the State of Michigan, May 14.

First Commencement of Hope College, July 17.

1876

The Rev. A.C. Van Raalte died, November 7.

1878

Giles Mandeville begins service as provisional president of Hope College.

1880

Charles Scott begins service as provisional president of Hope College. Elected Hope's second president in 1885; inaugurated, June 21, 1886.

1886

Construction started on the President's Home (completed in 1892).

1892

Graves Library and Winants Chapel cornerstone laid October 12; dedicated, June 26, 1894.

1893

Gerrit J. Kollen elected third president of Hope College; inaugurated, June 27, 1894.

1903

Van Raalte Memorial Hall dedicated, September (destroyed by fire April 28, 1980).

1906

Carnegie Gymnasium dedicated, June (renamed Carnegie-Schouten Gymnasium in 1954; razed in July, 1982).

1907

Elizabeth R. Voorhees Girls Residence dedicated, June.

1911

Ame Vennema 1879 elected fourth president of Hope College; inaugurated, February 19, 1912.

1918

Edward D. Dimnent elected fifth president of Hope College; inaugurated, May 14, 1919.

1929

The Memorial Chapel dedicated, June (renamed Dimnent Memorial Chapel in 1959). The building features beautiful stained glass windows.

1931

Wynand Wichers elected sixth president of Hope College; inaugurated, October 12, 1931.

1938

Hope Preparatory School, originally the Pioneer School, discontinued.

1942

Science Building (later Lubbers Hall) formally opened, September 16.

1945

Irwin J. Lubbers ’17 elected seventh president of Hope College; begins, Summer, 1945.

1950

Formal opening of Winifred Hackley Durfee Hall, residence hall for women, September 26.

1956

Music Hall completed (named for the late John B. Nykerk in 1962).

Kollen Hall opened (dedicated, September 1, 1957).

1960

Phelps Hall dedicated.

1961

Van Zoeren Library opened September (dedicated, October 8; renamed Van Zoeren Hall in 1988).

1963

Calvin A. VanderWerf ’37 elected eighth president of Hope College; inaugurated, November 16, 1963.

Fraternity Dormitory Complex opened.

Gilmore Hall opened, September.

1964

Physics Mathematics Hall opened September (renamed VanderWerf Hall of Physics and Mathematics, October 9, 1981).

1967

Dykstra Hall completed, September.

1969

Brumler House for apartment living dedicated, September 28.

1970

William Vander Lugt begins service as chancellor of Hope College (until 1972).

Wynand Wichers addition to Nykerk Hall of Music dedicated, October 25.

1971

DeWitt Student and Cultural Center opened, September; main theatre renovated, 1996–97.

1972

Gordon J. Van Wylen elected ninth president of Hope College; inaugurated, October 13, 1972.

1973

Peale Science Center opened, August. Major renovation completed, summer, 2004.

1978

Dow Health and Physical Education Center opened, August.

1982

College East Apartments opened, August.

DePree Art Center and gallery, a former furniture factory, dedicated, October 15.

1983

The 118th Commencement ceremony conducted at Holland Municipal Stadium, the first Commencement held outdoors in Hope's history, May 8.

1986

Maas Student and Conference Center constructed.

1987

John H. Jacobson, Jr., elected 10th president of Hope College; inaugurated, October 10, 1987.

1988

Van Wylen Library dedicated, April 21.

The Holland Theatre downtown donated to the college and renamed and reopened by Hope as the Knickerbocker Theatre.

Admissions House completed, May.

1989

College Guest House at 85 E. 10th Street opened, September; renamed the Keppel Guest House, March 29, 1992; becomes Campus Ministries office, summer, 1994; moved to 129 E. 10th Street, August 16, 1995.

1990

Van Andel Plaza dedicated, August 17.

Paul G. Fried International Center dedicated, September 22; International Education moves to the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication, summer 2005.

Van Zoeren/VanderWerf renovation and DeWitt Center for Economics Business dedicated, October 12.

1991

The track and field facilities at the Ekdal J. Buys athletic complex are named in honor of Gordon Brewer ’48, April 27.

Lugers Fieldhouse dedicated, September 28.

1994

Six-court, indoor DeWitt Tennis Center dedicated, October 14.

1996

78-84 E. Eighth St. and 100 E. Eighth St. purchased, announced October 2. The 100 E is building named Anderson-Werkman Financial Center in honor of staff members William K. Anderson and Barry L. Werkman, May, 2005.

1997

Statue of the Rev. A.C. Van Raalte dedicated at Centennial Park as part of the city's sesquicentennial celebration, May 1.

Haworth Inn and Conference Center completed, January; dedicated, May 22.

Cook Hall dedicated, October 17.

1998

James E. Bultman ’63 elected the 11th president of Hope College; inaugurated, October 22, 1999.

1999

Addition to Nykerk Hall of Music provides space for an organ studio; organ dedicated, October 6, 2000.

2002

Three racquetball courts in the Dow Center transformed into a weight room and fitness room; the former weight room becomes a dance studio; summer.

2003

Dykstra Hall renovated during the summer.

The new science center, connected to the west side of the Peale Science Center, opens for use with the start of the school year.

2004

Major renovation completed of the Peale Science Center, summer; dedication for the science center, October 8. Entire facility named in honor of Dr. A. Paul Schaap '67, May 5, 2006.

2005

The Martha Miller Center for Global Communication opens.

The Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse opens. Both basketball teams go undefeated in their first season in the $22 million facility.

An addition to Cook Hall is completed.

2006

A $3 million renovation of historic Lubbers Hall is completed.

2007

Historic Skinner organ in Dimnent Memorial Chapel rededicated following restoration, January 30, 2007.

2008

Baseball and softball fields renovated and stadiums built and named, respectively, in honor of Ronald ’60 and Sunny Boeve, and Karla Hoesch ’73 Wolters and Tom Wolters ’73.

2009

A $5.7 million adaptive restoration of Graves Hall is completed. Building is rededicated on October 9, 2009.

Hope constructs the $5.3 million Van Andel Soccer Stadium. Facility is dedicated on October 17, 2009.

2011

Renovation of VanderWerf and Van Zoeren halls adds and enhances multiple research laboratories in engineering and physics.

2012

The 12-court, outdoor VandePoel-Heeringa Stadium Courts open on June 4, 2012, and are dedicated on September 22, 2012.

Hope renovates Holland Municipal Stadium, which opened in 1979, during the summer in anticipation of purchasing the stadium from the City of Holland later in the year. The college renames the stadium for Ray and Sue Smith in January 2013.

2013

A two-year renovation of the Phelps Hall dining hall begins in May, with completion scheduled for the start of fall-semester classes in 2014.

The Tom and Ryan Cook Village, a four-building complex providing up-scale housing for 60 students, is completed during the summer.

The Haworth Engineering Center, a three-level, 9,000-square-foot wing added to VanderWerf Hall, is completed. Building is dedicated on September 6, 2013.

John C. Knapp elected the 12th president of Hope College; inaugurated, October 4, 2013.